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Views and experiences of people with acne vulgaris and healthcare professionals about treatments: systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research

Views and experiences of people with acne vulgaris and healthcare professionals about treatments: systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research
Views and experiences of people with acne vulgaris and healthcare professionals about treatments: systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research
Abstract
Objectives The objective of this study was to systematically review and synthesise qualitative papers exploring views and experiences of acne and its treatments among people with acne, their carers and healthcare professionals (HCPs).

Design Systematic review and synthesis of qualitative papers.

Methods Papers were identified through Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsychINFO and CINAHL on 05 November 2019, forward and backward citation searching, Google Scholar and contacting authors. Inclusion criteria were studies reporting qualitative data and analysis, studies carried out among people with acne, their carers or HCPs and studies comprising different skin conditions, including acne. The title and abstracts of papers were independently screened by three researchers. Appraisal was carried out using the adapted Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. Thematic synthesis was used to synthesise findings.

Results A total of 20 papers were included from six countries. Papers explored; experiences living with acne, psychosocial impact of acne, views on causation of acne, perceptions of acne treatments, ambivalence and ambiguity in young people’s experience of acne and HCPs’ attitudes towards acne management. Findings suggest that people often viewed acne as short-term and that this had implications for acne management, particularly long-term treatment adherence. People often felt that the substantial impact of acne was not recognised by others, or that their condition was ‘trivialised’ by HCPs. The sense of a lack of control over acne and control over treatment was linked to both psychological impact and treatment adherence. Concerns and uncertainty over acne treatments were influenced by variable advice and information from others.

Conclusions People need support with understanding the long-term management of acne, building control over acne and its treatments, acknowledging the impact and appropriate information to reduce the barriers to effective treatment use.
acne, dermatology, qualitative research
2044-6055
Ip, Athena
a61d3c1f-66b6-471b-9dc8-e29aea14c449
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Geraghty, Adam
2c6549fe-9868-4806-b65a-21881c1930af
Platt, Duncan
fe078e38-3382-42ad-b390-bbb372ec6268
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc
Ip, Athena
a61d3c1f-66b6-471b-9dc8-e29aea14c449
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Geraghty, Adam
2c6549fe-9868-4806-b65a-21881c1930af
Platt, Duncan
fe078e38-3382-42ad-b390-bbb372ec6268
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc

Ip, Athena, Muller, Ingrid, Geraghty, Adam, Platt, Duncan, Little, Paul and Santer, Miriam (2021) Views and experiences of people with acne vulgaris and healthcare professionals about treatments: systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research. BMJ Open, 11 (2), [e041794]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2020-041794).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Abstract
Objectives The objective of this study was to systematically review and synthesise qualitative papers exploring views and experiences of acne and its treatments among people with acne, their carers and healthcare professionals (HCPs).

Design Systematic review and synthesis of qualitative papers.

Methods Papers were identified through Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsychINFO and CINAHL on 05 November 2019, forward and backward citation searching, Google Scholar and contacting authors. Inclusion criteria were studies reporting qualitative data and analysis, studies carried out among people with acne, their carers or HCPs and studies comprising different skin conditions, including acne. The title and abstracts of papers were independently screened by three researchers. Appraisal was carried out using the adapted Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. Thematic synthesis was used to synthesise findings.

Results A total of 20 papers were included from six countries. Papers explored; experiences living with acne, psychosocial impact of acne, views on causation of acne, perceptions of acne treatments, ambivalence and ambiguity in young people’s experience of acne and HCPs’ attitudes towards acne management. Findings suggest that people often viewed acne as short-term and that this had implications for acne management, particularly long-term treatment adherence. People often felt that the substantial impact of acne was not recognised by others, or that their condition was ‘trivialised’ by HCPs. The sense of a lack of control over acne and control over treatment was linked to both psychological impact and treatment adherence. Concerns and uncertainty over acne treatments were influenced by variable advice and information from others.

Conclusions People need support with understanding the long-term management of acne, building control over acne and its treatments, acknowledging the impact and appropriate information to reduce the barriers to effective treatment use.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 January 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 February 2021
Published date: 1 February 2021
Keywords: acne, dermatology, qualitative research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447965
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447965
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: 1f7c35b9-3b27-412b-98e3-15b6c0af9cca
ORCID for Athena Ip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8574-2569
ORCID for Ingrid Muller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9341-6133
ORCID for Adam Geraghty: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7984-8351
ORCID for Miriam Santer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7264-5260

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Mar 2021 16:30
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 02:56

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Contributors

Author: Athena Ip ORCID iD
Author: Ingrid Muller ORCID iD
Author: Adam Geraghty ORCID iD
Author: Duncan Platt
Author: Paul Little
Author: Miriam Santer ORCID iD

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