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Intersectionality and coalitions in social movement research—A survey and outlook

Intersectionality and coalitions in social movement research—A survey and outlook
Intersectionality and coalitions in social movement research—A survey and outlook
Over the last thirty years, intersectionality has become a prominent concept, but in social movement scholarship its adoption has yet been limited. So far, the concept is primarily employed to analyze the mobilisation of women of color and other gendered mobilizations. In this article, I argue that intersectionality matters for all social movements – both as an analytic and as a political strategy. It is important to understand that all social movements and movement organizations are shaped by multiple axes of privilege and discrimination which influence who participates in these movements and how, what demands are pursued and which are neglected, and how the issues of the movements and movement organizations are framed. My review starts out with defining and distinguishing between structural intersectionality and political intersectionality. Then I survey a range of social movements from an intersectional perspective. This is followed by a discussion of coalitions and other strategies to achieve political intersectionality. The article concludes with an outlook on future directions for intersectional analyses in social movement scholarship.
Black Lives Matter, LGBTQ+, coalitions, inclusion, political intersectionality, structural intersectionality, women of color
1751-9020
1-16
Roth, Silke
cd4e63d8-bd84-45c1-b317-5850d2a362b6
Roth, Silke
cd4e63d8-bd84-45c1-b317-5850d2a362b6

Roth, Silke (2021) Intersectionality and coalitions in social movement research—A survey and outlook. Sociology Compass, 15 (7), 1-16, [e12885]. (doi:10.1111/soc4.12885).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Over the last thirty years, intersectionality has become a prominent concept, but in social movement scholarship its adoption has yet been limited. So far, the concept is primarily employed to analyze the mobilisation of women of color and other gendered mobilizations. In this article, I argue that intersectionality matters for all social movements – both as an analytic and as a political strategy. It is important to understand that all social movements and movement organizations are shaped by multiple axes of privilege and discrimination which influence who participates in these movements and how, what demands are pursued and which are neglected, and how the issues of the movements and movement organizations are framed. My review starts out with defining and distinguishing between structural intersectionality and political intersectionality. Then I survey a range of social movements from an intersectional perspective. This is followed by a discussion of coalitions and other strategies to achieve political intersectionality. The article concludes with an outlook on future directions for intersectional analyses in social movement scholarship.

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SoCo Intersectionality accepted 17 March 2021 - Accepted Manuscript
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SoCo Intersectionality accepted 17 March 2021
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Accepted/In Press date: 17 April 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 May 2021
Published date: 4 May 2021
Keywords: Black Lives Matter, LGBTQ+, coalitions, inclusion, political intersectionality, structural intersectionality, women of color

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 447977
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/447977
ISSN: 1751-9020
PURE UUID: b1c44e76-15c4-463d-857d-672c02e465f5
ORCID for Silke Roth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8760-0505

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Date deposited: 29 Mar 2021 16:36
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:50

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