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Non-equilibrium nuclear spin states

Non-equilibrium nuclear spin states
Non-equilibrium nuclear spin states
Any physical quantum system is in thermal contact with its environment and if left undisturbed, will always come to thermal equilibrium with its surroundings. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques however displace the system from its thermal equilibrium position. The amount of time a system may be displaced from its thermal equilibrium position is inherently time limited due to constant information exchange between the system and the environment. This fundamental process is known as quantum relaxation or quantum decoherence. In this thesis we focus our attention on the relaxation dynamics of nuclear spin ensembles. Particular spin configurations may display surprisingly long relaxation time constants and surprising dynamical behaviour as the system deviates further from its thermal equilibrium position. A simple framework for the description of nuclear spin systems far from thermal equilibrium is described and its necessity is experimentally demonstrated by consideration of simple model systems. The presented framework aims to advance recent developments in the storage of hyperpolarised materials, which ideally posses exceptionally long relaxation times and highly ordered spin configurations.
University of Southampton
Bengs, Christian
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Bengs, Christian
cd3282d0-27ad-444f-bcb4-70eeab0029b9
Levitt, Malcolm
bcc5a80a-e5c5-4e0e-9a9a-249d036747c3

Bengs, Christian (2020) Non-equilibrium nuclear spin states. Doctoral Thesis, 144pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Any physical quantum system is in thermal contact with its environment and if left undisturbed, will always come to thermal equilibrium with its surroundings. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques however displace the system from its thermal equilibrium position. The amount of time a system may be displaced from its thermal equilibrium position is inherently time limited due to constant information exchange between the system and the environment. This fundamental process is known as quantum relaxation or quantum decoherence. In this thesis we focus our attention on the relaxation dynamics of nuclear spin ensembles. Particular spin configurations may display surprisingly long relaxation time constants and surprising dynamical behaviour as the system deviates further from its thermal equilibrium position. A simple framework for the description of nuclear spin systems far from thermal equilibrium is described and its necessity is experimentally demonstrated by consideration of simple model systems. The presented framework aims to advance recent developments in the storage of hyperpolarised materials, which ideally posses exceptionally long relaxation times and highly ordered spin configurations.

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Published date: May 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448149
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448149
PURE UUID: 201419b2-187e-425d-bc89-2558bf09a0a5
ORCID for Malcolm Levitt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9878-1180

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Date deposited: 13 Apr 2021 16:30
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 02:48

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Contributors

Author: Christian Bengs
Thesis advisor: Malcolm Levitt ORCID iD

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