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The role of attachment in influencing reactions to manipulated feedback from romantic partners

The role of attachment in influencing reactions to manipulated feedback from romantic partners
The role of attachment in influencing reactions to manipulated feedback from romantic partners
A study of 80 couples (mean age 24) examined the impact of attachment patterns on reactions to manipulated positive or negative feedback, ostensibly from partners. As expected, individuals high in attachment anxiety reported more negative mood and the least indifference to partner feedback. In addition, those high in attachment anxiety reported more negative reactions to negative feedback compared to those low in anxiety. Those high in attachment anxiety reported lower self-competence after receiving negative feedback than those low in anxiety. Further, reactions to manipulated feedback mediated the relationship between attachment anxiety and self-competence. Attachment models play a role in determining reactions to partner feedback and moderate how feedback is used to maintain self-views.
0046-2772
968-986
Carnelley, Katherine B.
02a55020-a0bc-480e-a0ff-c8fe56ee9c36
Israel, Suzanne
1403900c-582a-4650-9207-07398c6d7c2c
Brennan, Kelly A.
8fef3984-af9d-4564-8d47-d2793eb4dc42
Carnelley, Katherine B.
02a55020-a0bc-480e-a0ff-c8fe56ee9c36
Israel, Suzanne
1403900c-582a-4650-9207-07398c6d7c2c
Brennan, Kelly A.
8fef3984-af9d-4564-8d47-d2793eb4dc42

Carnelley, Katherine B., Israel, Suzanne and Brennan, Kelly A. (2007) The role of attachment in influencing reactions to manipulated feedback from romantic partners. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37 (5), 968-986. (doi:10.1002/ejsp.409).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A study of 80 couples (mean age 24) examined the impact of attachment patterns on reactions to manipulated positive or negative feedback, ostensibly from partners. As expected, individuals high in attachment anxiety reported more negative mood and the least indifference to partner feedback. In addition, those high in attachment anxiety reported more negative reactions to negative feedback compared to those low in anxiety. Those high in attachment anxiety reported lower self-competence after receiving negative feedback than those low in anxiety. Further, reactions to manipulated feedback mediated the relationship between attachment anxiety and self-competence. Attachment models play a role in determining reactions to partner feedback and moderate how feedback is used to maintain self-views.

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More information

Submitted date: 6 September 2005
Published date: September 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44815
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44815
ISSN: 0046-2772
PURE UUID: e7702eba-835a-4c50-9192-eccd9920f6ca

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Date deposited: 15 Mar 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:06

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