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Biases in visual orienting to negative and positive scenes in dysphoria: an eye movement study

Biases in visual orienting to negative and positive scenes in dysphoria: an eye movement study
Biases in visual orienting to negative and positive scenes in dysphoria: an eye movement study
The study investigated biases for negative information in component processes of visual attention (initial shift vs. maintenance of gaze) in dysphoric and nondysphoric individuals. Eye movements were recorded while participants viewed a series of picture pairs depicting negative, positive, and neutral scenes (each pair presented for 3 s). Biases in initial orienting were assessed from the direction and latency of the initial shift in gaze, whereas biases in the maintenance of attention were assessed from the duration of gaze on the picture that was initially fixated. Results indicated that the dysphoric group showed a significantly greater bias to maintain gaze longer on negative pictures, relative to control pictures, compared with the nondysphoric group. There was no evidence of a dysphoria-related bias in initial shift of orienting to negative cues. Results are consistent with a depression-related bias that operates in the maintenance of attention on negative material.
491-497
Caseras, Xavier
b7625655-f4c6-47e4-b657-b36571e7a7df
Garner, Matthew
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Bradley, Brendan P.
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Mogg, Karin
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30
Caseras, Xavier
b7625655-f4c6-47e4-b657-b36571e7a7df
Garner, Matthew
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Bradley, Brendan P.
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Mogg, Karin
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30

Caseras, Xavier, Garner, Matthew, Bradley, Brendan P. and Mogg, Karin (2007) Biases in visual orienting to negative and positive scenes in dysphoria: an eye movement study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 116 (3), 491-497. (doi:10.1037/0021-843X.116.3.491).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The study investigated biases for negative information in component processes of visual attention (initial shift vs. maintenance of gaze) in dysphoric and nondysphoric individuals. Eye movements were recorded while participants viewed a series of picture pairs depicting negative, positive, and neutral scenes (each pair presented for 3 s). Biases in initial orienting were assessed from the direction and latency of the initial shift in gaze, whereas biases in the maintenance of attention were assessed from the duration of gaze on the picture that was initially fixated. Results indicated that the dysphoric group showed a significantly greater bias to maintain gaze longer on negative pictures, relative to control pictures, compared with the nondysphoric group. There was no evidence of a dysphoria-related bias in initial shift of orienting to negative cues. Results are consistent with a depression-related bias that operates in the maintenance of attention on negative material.

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Published date: August 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44817
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44817
PURE UUID: d2bea17d-235c-4657-911c-7706a6a70905
ORCID for Brendan P. Bradley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2801-4271

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Date deposited: 16 Mar 2007
Last modified: 17 Jul 2019 01:00

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