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Soft tissue-optimised micro-computed tomographic imaging for the study of early stages of colorectal cancer.

Soft tissue-optimised micro-computed tomographic imaging for the study of early stages of colorectal cancer.
Soft tissue-optimised micro-computed tomographic imaging for the study of early stages of colorectal cancer.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, where diagnosis at early stage is vital for effective treatment. We hypothesise that high-resolution 3D imaging can reveal aspects of CRC initiation and progression that are not easily perceived through 2D histology, the current gold standard for diagnosis. We employed soft tissue-optimised X-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT) to explore how the colonic structure changes during early stages of CRC. Azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulphate (AOM/DSS) were used to induce inflammation-associated CRC in 36 male C57BL/6J mice, recreating the conditions of three distinct stages of CRC: early-initiation, mid-progression and late-cancerous tumours. To increase the inherently low X-ray contrast of the colon, so-called in-line phase contrast synchrotron µCT imaging was employed. This advanced imaging technique provides increased image contrast of soft tissues, due to the coherence of the synchrotron source. Our sample preparation protocol for µCT imaging involved fixation in 10% neutral buffered formaldehyde for 24 hours and embedding in cylindrical wax blocks (5 mm diameter and height). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colons of 18 controls and 18 CRC-treated mice were scanned at the I13-2 beamline of Diamond Light Source, the UK’s national synchrotron. The high spatial resolution (pixel-size was 2.2 µm), the high image contrast and the 3D results allowed for resolving the microstructural details of colonic crypts, which play a significant role in identifying changes of colonic structures during different stages of CRC. We are currently studying and identifying structural markers of early-stage CRC, with the aim to investigate how the novel high-resolution 3D µCT data can complement and improve the diagnostic information from microscopic images of conventional 2D histology slides. In the long run, our ambition is to establish the foundations for routine ‘3D X-ray histology’ using lab-based µCT for the diagnosis of soft tissue-related diseases such as CRC.
Rossides, Harry
8ea65ff8-3ba0-46d3-9f88-18553aedfb7d
Pender, Sylvia
62528b03-ec42-41bb-80fe-48454c2c5242
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Rossides, Harry
8ea65ff8-3ba0-46d3-9f88-18553aedfb7d
Pender, Sylvia
62528b03-ec42-41bb-80fe-48454c2c5242
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad

Rossides, Harry, Pender, Sylvia and Schneider, Philipp (2018) Soft tissue-optimised micro-computed tomographic imaging for the study of early stages of colorectal cancer. Southampton Medical and Health Research Conference, Southampton General Hospital (SGH), Southampton, United Kingdom.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, where diagnosis at early stage is vital for effective treatment. We hypothesise that high-resolution 3D imaging can reveal aspects of CRC initiation and progression that are not easily perceived through 2D histology, the current gold standard for diagnosis. We employed soft tissue-optimised X-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT) to explore how the colonic structure changes during early stages of CRC. Azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulphate (AOM/DSS) were used to induce inflammation-associated CRC in 36 male C57BL/6J mice, recreating the conditions of three distinct stages of CRC: early-initiation, mid-progression and late-cancerous tumours. To increase the inherently low X-ray contrast of the colon, so-called in-line phase contrast synchrotron µCT imaging was employed. This advanced imaging technique provides increased image contrast of soft tissues, due to the coherence of the synchrotron source. Our sample preparation protocol for µCT imaging involved fixation in 10% neutral buffered formaldehyde for 24 hours and embedding in cylindrical wax blocks (5 mm diameter and height). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colons of 18 controls and 18 CRC-treated mice were scanned at the I13-2 beamline of Diamond Light Source, the UK’s national synchrotron. The high spatial resolution (pixel-size was 2.2 µm), the high image contrast and the 3D results allowed for resolving the microstructural details of colonic crypts, which play a significant role in identifying changes of colonic structures during different stages of CRC. We are currently studying and identifying structural markers of early-stage CRC, with the aim to investigate how the novel high-resolution 3D µCT data can complement and improve the diagnostic information from microscopic images of conventional 2D histology slides. In the long run, our ambition is to establish the foundations for routine ‘3D X-ray histology’ using lab-based µCT for the diagnosis of soft tissue-related diseases such as CRC.

Other
Charalambos Rossides abstract - Soton medical and health research conference 2018 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 6 June 2018
Venue - Dates: Southampton Medical and Health Research Conference, Southampton General Hospital (SGH), Southampton, United Kingdom, 2018-06-06

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448239
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448239
PURE UUID: a60d0a7c-cd85-47e3-81e1-ecf81780ad84
ORCID for Harry Rossides: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7547-0256
ORCID for Sylvia Pender: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6332-0333
ORCID for Philipp Schneider: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7499-3576

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Apr 2021 16:34
Last modified: 16 Apr 2021 01:53

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