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How can a research-informed approach to the integration of self-regulated learning strategies support sustainable assessment practices at a college of education, Oman?

How can a research-informed approach to the integration of self-regulated learning strategies support sustainable assessment practices at a college of education, Oman?
How can a research-informed approach to the integration of self-regulated learning strategies support sustainable assessment practices at a college of education, Oman?
Using a socio-cognitive theory, this PhD thesis investigated the effect of modelling self-regulated learning strategies (SRLS), as highlighted by Zimmerman’s (2002) model of self-regulation of learning, in a writing course, in a foundation year programme at a college of Education in Oman, on sustaining assessment practices (SAPs). SAPs are defined as practices that enable learners to take responsibility for their learning as part of developing their self-regulation learning strategies especially their self-evaluation skills and promote transfer of learnt skills and strategies to new learning situations over time. Self-regulation is widely discussed as a key factor for success in higher education, including improving students’ academic writing performance. This research hypothesised that the majority of students enter higher education with limited awareness and use of SRLS, and that the integration of SRLS has a positive effect on students’ academic performance and on sustaining assessment practices. To test the hypotheses, a post-positivist paradigm was adopted, as reflected in the choice of the quasi-experimental, three-point measurement design. SRLS were implemented via teacher modelling in a writing course. A convenience-purposive sample of 46 pre-intermediate foundation level students, assigned into two intact groups, was selected to measure the effect of the intervention on one group (experimental) compared to the other (control) group. Students’ awareness and use of the strategies were measured by a self-regulated learning multi-items scale, and the effect of the implemented strategies was explored through students’ writing scores, observations, semi-structured interviews and field notes. The longitudinal element of the study intended to measure the effect of such implementation beyond the intervention stage (sustainability) via the SRL scale (post-post-test) and semi-structured interviews was a major feature of this study. Teachers’ views on the assessment design, students’ SRLS and transferability of skills were also explored through semi-structured interviews. Findings revealed that the impacts of the intervention on the experimental group were evident in that the students’ use of SRLS were stable across the academic year compared to their counterparts in the control group who experienced a general decrease in their perceptions of SRLS across the year. Moreover, a delayed effect of SRLS were detected in the experimental group essay writing scores which were statistically significantly higher than their counterparts in the control group. However, both groups performed equally in more complex writing tasks i.e. writing a research paper. Moreover, Students’ reflections of their SRLS use and teachers’ reflections of their assessment practices based on Evan’s EAT framework identified the importance of scaffolding students’ ‘transition from school to college’, the ‘teaching approach’ , ‘students and teachers’ beliefs and values’, and ‘task demands and cognitive load’ as key factors affecting the development of students’ SRLS. Furthermore, students’ use of SRLS is unique and affected by different factors, one of which is their self-efficacy and their perceived value of the task, and this implies that the existing SRLS models do not represent, as closely as previously thought, the cognitive, behavioural, and affective strategies students utilise whilst performing a writing task, and thus new models are needed. A key contribution of this piece of research is a framework for training teachers in SRLS theories and models to support students’ development of writing skills and overarching self-regulation strategies, emphasising the importance of the addition and/or removal of scaffold as required and highlighting the relation between perceived task demands and the related cognitive load, especially as changes targeting beliefs requires a sufficient period of time to take place. Moreover, implications from this research in relation to the successful implementation of SRLS requires looking at assessment holistically including raising students’ and teachers' awareness of their roles, discussing assessment criteria and procedures, identifying the role of students in their learning and assessment process, and continuous evaluation of the assessment objectives and procedures based on students’ needs, taking into account contextual enablers and barriers and students’ individual learning differences.
University of Southampton
Al'Adawi, Sharifa Said Ali
3232f2e0-ca08-406b-96ef-ae20a0e0ce03
Al'Adawi, Sharifa Said Ali
3232f2e0-ca08-406b-96ef-ae20a0e0ce03

Al'Adawi, Sharifa Said Ali (2020) How can a research-informed approach to the integration of self-regulated learning strategies support sustainable assessment practices at a college of education, Oman? Doctoral Thesis, 379pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Using a socio-cognitive theory, this PhD thesis investigated the effect of modelling self-regulated learning strategies (SRLS), as highlighted by Zimmerman’s (2002) model of self-regulation of learning, in a writing course, in a foundation year programme at a college of Education in Oman, on sustaining assessment practices (SAPs). SAPs are defined as practices that enable learners to take responsibility for their learning as part of developing their self-regulation learning strategies especially their self-evaluation skills and promote transfer of learnt skills and strategies to new learning situations over time. Self-regulation is widely discussed as a key factor for success in higher education, including improving students’ academic writing performance. This research hypothesised that the majority of students enter higher education with limited awareness and use of SRLS, and that the integration of SRLS has a positive effect on students’ academic performance and on sustaining assessment practices. To test the hypotheses, a post-positivist paradigm was adopted, as reflected in the choice of the quasi-experimental, three-point measurement design. SRLS were implemented via teacher modelling in a writing course. A convenience-purposive sample of 46 pre-intermediate foundation level students, assigned into two intact groups, was selected to measure the effect of the intervention on one group (experimental) compared to the other (control) group. Students’ awareness and use of the strategies were measured by a self-regulated learning multi-items scale, and the effect of the implemented strategies was explored through students’ writing scores, observations, semi-structured interviews and field notes. The longitudinal element of the study intended to measure the effect of such implementation beyond the intervention stage (sustainability) via the SRL scale (post-post-test) and semi-structured interviews was a major feature of this study. Teachers’ views on the assessment design, students’ SRLS and transferability of skills were also explored through semi-structured interviews. Findings revealed that the impacts of the intervention on the experimental group were evident in that the students’ use of SRLS were stable across the academic year compared to their counterparts in the control group who experienced a general decrease in their perceptions of SRLS across the year. Moreover, a delayed effect of SRLS were detected in the experimental group essay writing scores which were statistically significantly higher than their counterparts in the control group. However, both groups performed equally in more complex writing tasks i.e. writing a research paper. Moreover, Students’ reflections of their SRLS use and teachers’ reflections of their assessment practices based on Evan’s EAT framework identified the importance of scaffolding students’ ‘transition from school to college’, the ‘teaching approach’ , ‘students and teachers’ beliefs and values’, and ‘task demands and cognitive load’ as key factors affecting the development of students’ SRLS. Furthermore, students’ use of SRLS is unique and affected by different factors, one of which is their self-efficacy and their perceived value of the task, and this implies that the existing SRLS models do not represent, as closely as previously thought, the cognitive, behavioural, and affective strategies students utilise whilst performing a writing task, and thus new models are needed. A key contribution of this piece of research is a framework for training teachers in SRLS theories and models to support students’ development of writing skills and overarching self-regulation strategies, emphasising the importance of the addition and/or removal of scaffold as required and highlighting the relation between perceived task demands and the related cognitive load, especially as changes targeting beliefs requires a sufficient period of time to take place. Moreover, implications from this research in relation to the successful implementation of SRLS requires looking at assessment holistically including raising students’ and teachers' awareness of their roles, discussing assessment criteria and procedures, identifying the role of students in their learning and assessment process, and continuous evaluation of the assessment objectives and procedures based on students’ needs, taking into account contextual enablers and barriers and students’ individual learning differences.

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Published date: April 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448275
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448275
PURE UUID: 8bdb082c-823b-42a8-80e9-b7b116b4a169
ORCID for Sharifa Said Ali Al'Adawi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9657-9875

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Date deposited: 19 Apr 2021 16:30
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 11:09

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Author: Sharifa Said Ali Al'Adawi ORCID iD

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