The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Incentivising the adoption of a global liability regime for transboundary harm from offshore oil and gas incidents

Incentivising the adoption of a global liability regime for transboundary harm from offshore oil and gas incidents
Incentivising the adoption of a global liability regime for transboundary harm from offshore oil and gas incidents
In June 2017, Heads of States convened in New York to uphold their “strong commitment” to ensure the sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources.1 This direction is by no means novel. The sovereign right of States to exploit natural resources located under the seabed within their jurisdiction has traditionally been counterbalanced by their general obligation to protect and preserve the marine environment and to prevent transboundary harm to neighbouring States. This thesis examines how the integration of the precautionary principle within the obligation of States to prevent transboundary harm from offshore activities under their jurisdiction contributes in the development of international environmental law to align with established international policy objectives. It advances that this integration refines the procedural and substantive facets of the obligation so as to require States to adopt one or more liability regime(s) dealing with such harm. Ultimately, it purports to present a legal argument in support of a policy action which adequately balances the aforesaid obligation and the sovereign right of States to exploit natural resources offshore. In doing so, it contributes towards the attainment of sustainable development.
University of Southampton
Dbouk, Wassim
02ad2746-a24c-4724-a02f-451691b9bab8
Dbouk, Wassim
02ad2746-a24c-4724-a02f-451691b9bab8

Dbouk, Wassim (2020) Incentivising the adoption of a global liability regime for transboundary harm from offshore oil and gas incidents. Doctoral Thesis, 384pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

In June 2017, Heads of States convened in New York to uphold their “strong commitment” to ensure the sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources.1 This direction is by no means novel. The sovereign right of States to exploit natural resources located under the seabed within their jurisdiction has traditionally been counterbalanced by their general obligation to protect and preserve the marine environment and to prevent transboundary harm to neighbouring States. This thesis examines how the integration of the precautionary principle within the obligation of States to prevent transboundary harm from offshore activities under their jurisdiction contributes in the development of international environmental law to align with established international policy objectives. It advances that this integration refines the procedural and substantive facets of the obligation so as to require States to adopt one or more liability regime(s) dealing with such harm. Ultimately, it purports to present a legal argument in support of a policy action which adequately balances the aforesaid obligation and the sovereign right of States to exploit natural resources offshore. In doing so, it contributes towards the attainment of sustainable development.

Text
Fourth Draft June 2020 (Corrections version)
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (2MB)
Text
Permission to deposit thesis - form (Dbouk)_RW
Restricted to Repository staff only

More information

Published date: 25 June 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448280
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448280
PURE UUID: 0888c4a8-4eac-4ea3-bc78-daed77800cab

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Apr 2021 16:30
Last modified: 19 Apr 2021 16:30

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×