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Listening to Long COVID: Epistemic Injustice and COVID-19 morbidity

Listening to Long COVID: Epistemic Injustice and COVID-19 morbidity
Listening to Long COVID: Epistemic Injustice and COVID-19 morbidity
In Long Covid, symptoms do not resolve within several weeks after acute infection with SARS-CoV-2. Patients with COVID-19 and long COVID face stigma and discrimination. One important type of discrimination is epistemic injustice which includes testimonial and hermeneutical injustices. Testimonial injustices occur when healthcare professional disregard or discount patients’ symptoms. This worsens healthcare outcomes and exacerbates challenges to adequate healthcare access at the individual level. Furthermore, testimonial injustices may lead to hermeneutical injustices – systemic underrepresentation of the experiences of the marginalized and minoritized. Healthcare professionals play an essential role in mitigating injustices and have a duty to reduce harms done to patients with long COVID. It is crucial that the clinician avoid multiplying associated harms by not engaging in epistemic injustices.

We suggest the disability model as an approach to improve clinicians’ response to long covid. Epistemic injustice leads to systemic inequities that affect those with chronic disease in general, particularly in populations suffering from structural inequities. The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity for solidarity with those suffering from other chronic diseases that have been marginalized and stigmatized.
Altiery De Jesus, Vivian V.
aac38f98-ec0d-4078-90b4-0f64b3372fd0
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Callard, Felicity
691f52bc-9d03-4c79-ae6e-33de87d14c8b
Berger, Zackary
35c2fa2e-f23e-4325-8582-a3c23059b802
Altiery De Jesus, Vivian V.
aac38f98-ec0d-4078-90b4-0f64b3372fd0
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Callard, Felicity
691f52bc-9d03-4c79-ae6e-33de87d14c8b
Berger, Zackary
35c2fa2e-f23e-4325-8582-a3c23059b802

Altiery De Jesus, Vivian V., Alwan, Nisreen, Callard, Felicity and Berger, Zackary (2021) Listening to Long COVID: Epistemic Injustice and COVID-19 morbidity. OSF Preprints. (doi:10.31219/osf.io/tfbnd).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In Long Covid, symptoms do not resolve within several weeks after acute infection with SARS-CoV-2. Patients with COVID-19 and long COVID face stigma and discrimination. One important type of discrimination is epistemic injustice which includes testimonial and hermeneutical injustices. Testimonial injustices occur when healthcare professional disregard or discount patients’ symptoms. This worsens healthcare outcomes and exacerbates challenges to adequate healthcare access at the individual level. Furthermore, testimonial injustices may lead to hermeneutical injustices – systemic underrepresentation of the experiences of the marginalized and minoritized. Healthcare professionals play an essential role in mitigating injustices and have a duty to reduce harms done to patients with long COVID. It is crucial that the clinician avoid multiplying associated harms by not engaging in epistemic injustices.

We suggest the disability model as an approach to improve clinicians’ response to long covid. Epistemic injustice leads to systemic inequities that affect those with chronic disease in general, particularly in populations suffering from structural inequities. The COVID-19 pandemic provides an opportunity for solidarity with those suffering from other chronic diseases that have been marginalized and stigmatized.

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Published date: 22 March 2021
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Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448347
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448347
PURE UUID: c9a1b4cb-490b-4114-ab38-277612363a7e
ORCID for Nisreen Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Apr 2021 16:34
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 03:15

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Contributors

Author: Vivian V. Altiery De Jesus
Author: Nisreen Alwan ORCID iD
Author: Felicity Callard
Author: Zackary Berger

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