The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Operationalising coastal resilience to flood and erosion hazard: A demonstration for England

Operationalising coastal resilience to flood and erosion hazard: A demonstration for England
Operationalising coastal resilience to flood and erosion hazard: A demonstration for England
Resilience is widely seen as an important attribute of coastal systems and, as a concept, is increasingly prominent in policy documents. However, there are conflicting ideas on what constitutes resilience and its operationalisation as an overarching principle of coastal management remains limited. In this paper, we show how resilience to coastal flood and erosion hazard could be measured and applied within policy processes, using England as a case study. We define resilience pragmatically, integrating what is presently a disparate set of policy objectives for coastal areas. Our definition uses the concepts of resistance, recovery and adaptation, to consider how the economic, social and environmental dimensions of coastal systems respond to change. We develop a set of composite indicators for each dimension, grounded empirically with reference to national geospatial datasets. A prototype Coastal Resilience Model (CRM) has been developed, which combines the dimensions and generates a quantitative resilience index. We apply it to England’s coastal hazard zone, capturing a range of different stakeholder perspectives using relative indicator weightings. The illustrative results demonstrate the practicality of formalising and quantifying resilience. To re-focus national policy around the stated desire of enhancing resilience to coastal flooding and erosion would require firm commitment from government to monitor progress towards resilience, requiring extension of the present risk-based approach, and a consensus methodology in which multiple (and sometimes conflicting) stakeholder values are explicitly considered. Such a transition may also challenge existing governance arrangements at national and local levels, requiring incentives for coastal managers to engage with and apply this new approach, more departmental integration and inter-agency cooperation. The proposed Coastal Resilience Model, with the tools to support planning and measure progress, have the potential to help enable this transition.
Adaptation pathways, Management, Policy, Resilient communities, Socio-economic resource allocation
0048-9697
Townend, Ian
f72e5186-cae8-41fd-8712-d5746f78328e
French, J.R.
719d0ebe-b924-45fb-8a88-27fd5b038806
Nicholls, Robert
2ab94554-a72f-4493-a5fb-0e7fc85ad1d2
Brown, Sally
49019923-02ad-49c8-969d-0b9acd87607a
Carpenter, Stephen
2bb17438-a015-49f6-b67f-22d584c49465
Haigh, Ivan
945ff20a-589c-47b7-b06f-61804367eb2d
Hill, Christopher
8b101c57-b1cf-4c65-af58-7adb48e0183b
Lazarus, Eli
642a3cdb-0d25-48b1-8ab8-8d1d72daca6e
Penning-Rowsell, Edmund
cdaf7079-d968-4878-bbce-8f7451a93f63
Thompson, Charlotte
2a304aa6-761e-4d99-b227-cedb67129bfb
Tompkins, Emma
a6116704-7140-4e37-bea1-2cbf39b138c3
Townend, Ian
f72e5186-cae8-41fd-8712-d5746f78328e
French, J.R.
719d0ebe-b924-45fb-8a88-27fd5b038806
Nicholls, Robert
2ab94554-a72f-4493-a5fb-0e7fc85ad1d2
Brown, Sally
49019923-02ad-49c8-969d-0b9acd87607a
Carpenter, Stephen
2bb17438-a015-49f6-b67f-22d584c49465
Haigh, Ivan
945ff20a-589c-47b7-b06f-61804367eb2d
Hill, Christopher
8b101c57-b1cf-4c65-af58-7adb48e0183b
Lazarus, Eli
642a3cdb-0d25-48b1-8ab8-8d1d72daca6e
Penning-Rowsell, Edmund
cdaf7079-d968-4878-bbce-8f7451a93f63
Thompson, Charlotte
2a304aa6-761e-4d99-b227-cedb67129bfb
Tompkins, Emma
a6116704-7140-4e37-bea1-2cbf39b138c3

Townend, Ian, French, J.R., Nicholls, Robert, Brown, Sally, Carpenter, Stephen, Haigh, Ivan, Hill, Christopher, Lazarus, Eli, Penning-Rowsell, Edmund, Thompson, Charlotte and Tompkins, Emma (2021) Operationalising coastal resilience to flood and erosion hazard: A demonstration for England. Science of the Total Environment, 783, [146880]. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146880).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Resilience is widely seen as an important attribute of coastal systems and, as a concept, is increasingly prominent in policy documents. However, there are conflicting ideas on what constitutes resilience and its operationalisation as an overarching principle of coastal management remains limited. In this paper, we show how resilience to coastal flood and erosion hazard could be measured and applied within policy processes, using England as a case study. We define resilience pragmatically, integrating what is presently a disparate set of policy objectives for coastal areas. Our definition uses the concepts of resistance, recovery and adaptation, to consider how the economic, social and environmental dimensions of coastal systems respond to change. We develop a set of composite indicators for each dimension, grounded empirically with reference to national geospatial datasets. A prototype Coastal Resilience Model (CRM) has been developed, which combines the dimensions and generates a quantitative resilience index. We apply it to England’s coastal hazard zone, capturing a range of different stakeholder perspectives using relative indicator weightings. The illustrative results demonstrate the practicality of formalising and quantifying resilience. To re-focus national policy around the stated desire of enhancing resilience to coastal flooding and erosion would require firm commitment from government to monitor progress towards resilience, requiring extension of the present risk-based approach, and a consensus methodology in which multiple (and sometimes conflicting) stakeholder values are explicitly considered. Such a transition may also challenge existing governance arrangements at national and local levels, requiring incentives for coastal managers to engage with and apply this new approach, more departmental integration and inter-agency cooperation. The proposed Coastal Resilience Model, with the tools to support planning and measure progress, have the potential to help enable this transition.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 March 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 April 2021
Keywords: Adaptation pathways, Management, Policy, Resilient communities, Socio-economic resource allocation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448359
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448359
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: 8d183eb9-63da-4715-85e3-e762d615dfdf
ORCID for Ian Townend: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2101-3858
ORCID for Eli Lazarus: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2404-9661

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Apr 2021 16:30
Last modified: 15 Sep 2021 02:12

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Ian Townend ORCID iD
Author: J.R. French
Author: Robert Nicholls
Author: Sally Brown
Author: Stephen Carpenter
Author: Ivan Haigh
Author: Eli Lazarus ORCID iD
Author: Edmund Penning-Rowsell
Author: Emma Tompkins

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×