The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Disproportionate CH4 sink strength from an endemic, sub-alpine Australian soil microbial community

Disproportionate CH4 sink strength from an endemic, sub-alpine Australian soil microbial community
Disproportionate CH4 sink strength from an endemic, sub-alpine Australian soil microbial community
Soil-to-atmosphere methane (CH4) fluxes are dependent on opposing microbial processes of production and consumption. Here we use a soil–vegetation gradient in an Australian sub-alpine ecosystem to examine links between composition of soil microbial communities, and the fluxes of greenhouse gases they regulate. For each soil/vegetation type (forest, grassland, and bog), we measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 fluxes and their production/consumption at 5 cm intervals to a depth of 30 cm. All soils were sources of CO2, ranging from 49 to 93 mg CO2 m−2 h−1. Forest soils were strong net sinks for CH4, at rates of up to −413 µg CH4 m−2 h−1. Grassland soils varied, with some soils acting as sources and some as sinks, but overall averaged −97 µg CH4 m−2 h−1. Bog soils were net sources of CH4 (+340 µg CH4 m−2 h−1). Methanotrophs were dominated by USCα in forest and grassland soils, and Candidatus Methylomirabilis in the bog soils. Methylocystis were also detected at relatively low abundance in all soils. Our study suggests that there is a disproportionately large contribution of these ecosystems to the global soil CH4 sink, which highlights our dependence on soil ecosystem services in remote locations driven by unique populations of soil microbes. It is paramount to explore and understand these remote, hard-to-reach ecosystems to better understand biogeochemical cycles that underpin global sustainability.
16S rRNA, Carbon dioxide, Methane, Methanogen, Methanotroph, Methylomirabilis, PmoA, USC-alpha, USCα
1-20
McDaniel, Marshall
2f1f732a-3920-42d3-866e-344559aa5624
Hernandez garcia, Marcela T
e73477e7-cf3e-4f50-97c8-4494c5b05cd0
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Ingram, Lachlan
1c225a61-2e21-4a87-b90f-a8dd7ea76edb
Adams, Mark
48c97af5-144e-484f-a64b-b618fa4ec486
McDaniel, Marshall
2f1f732a-3920-42d3-866e-344559aa5624
Hernandez garcia, Marcela T
e73477e7-cf3e-4f50-97c8-4494c5b05cd0
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Ingram, Lachlan
1c225a61-2e21-4a87-b90f-a8dd7ea76edb
Adams, Mark
48c97af5-144e-484f-a64b-b618fa4ec486

McDaniel, Marshall, Hernandez garcia, Marcela T, Dumont, Marc, Ingram, Lachlan and Adams, Mark (2021) Disproportionate CH4 sink strength from an endemic, sub-alpine Australian soil microbial community. Microorganisms, 9 (3), 1-20, [606]. (doi:10.3390/microorganisms9030606).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Soil-to-atmosphere methane (CH4) fluxes are dependent on opposing microbial processes of production and consumption. Here we use a soil–vegetation gradient in an Australian sub-alpine ecosystem to examine links between composition of soil microbial communities, and the fluxes of greenhouse gases they regulate. For each soil/vegetation type (forest, grassland, and bog), we measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 fluxes and their production/consumption at 5 cm intervals to a depth of 30 cm. All soils were sources of CO2, ranging from 49 to 93 mg CO2 m−2 h−1. Forest soils were strong net sinks for CH4, at rates of up to −413 µg CH4 m−2 h−1. Grassland soils varied, with some soils acting as sources and some as sinks, but overall averaged −97 µg CH4 m−2 h−1. Bog soils were net sources of CH4 (+340 µg CH4 m−2 h−1). Methanotrophs were dominated by USCα in forest and grassland soils, and Candidatus Methylomirabilis in the bog soils. Methylocystis were also detected at relatively low abundance in all soils. Our study suggests that there is a disproportionately large contribution of these ecosystems to the global soil CH4 sink, which highlights our dependence on soil ecosystem services in remote locations driven by unique populations of soil microbes. It is paramount to explore and understand these remote, hard-to-reach ecosystems to better understand biogeochemical cycles that underpin global sustainability.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 March 2021
Published date: 15 March 2021
Keywords: 16S rRNA, Carbon dioxide, Methane, Methanogen, Methanotroph, Methylomirabilis, PmoA, USC-alpha, USCα

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448405
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448405
PURE UUID: eaeb6960-7324-4e2d-8816-4303f2c75b61
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Apr 2021 16:34
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:05

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Marshall McDaniel
Author: Marcela T Hernandez garcia
Author: Marc Dumont ORCID iD
Author: Lachlan Ingram
Author: Mark Adams

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×