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Rewiring of peatland plant–microbe networks outpaces species turnover

Rewiring of peatland plant–microbe networks outpaces species turnover
Rewiring of peatland plant–microbe networks outpaces species turnover
Enviro–climatic changes are thought to be causing alterations in ecosystem processes through shifts in plant and microbial communities; however, how links between plant and microbial communities change with enviro–climatic change is likely to be less straightforward but may be fundamental for many ecological processes. To address this, we assessed the composition of the plant community and the prokaryotic community – using amplicon‐based sequencing – of three European peatlands that were distinct in enviro–climatic conditions. Bipartite networks were used to construct site‐specific plant–prokaryote co‐occurrence networks. Our data show that between sites, plant and prokaryotic communities differ and that turnover in interactions between the communities was complex. Essentially, turnover in plant–microbial interactions is much faster than turnover in the respective communities. Our findings suggest that network rewiring does largely result from novel or different interactions between species common to all realised networks. Hence, turnover in network composition is largely driven by the establishment of new interactions between a core community of plants and microorganisms that are shared among all sites. Taken together our results indicate that plant–microbe associations are context dependent, and that changes in enviro–climatic conditions will likely lead to network rewiring. Integrating turnover in plant–microbe interactions into studies that assess the impact of enviro–climatic change on peatland ecosystems is essential to understand ecosystem dynamics and must be combined with studies on the impact of these changes on ecosystem processes.
16S amplicon sequencing, 16S rRNA, bipartite networks, microbial and plant diversity, peatlands, plant–microbe interactions
0030-1299
339-353
Robroek, Bjorn JM
06dcb269-687c-41db-ab73-f61899617f92
Marti, Magali
8a7caa6d-4e6e-4677-bd31-feb317300f1f
Svensson, Bo H
3dd78f92-01ba-431e-9423-af89f895be49
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Veraart, Annelies J
7a3f3154-4edf-473c-b233-eeae50eb457b
Jassey, Vincent
f821a8ae-2435-41e8-9c4b-ef274b176b82
Robroek, Bjorn JM
06dcb269-687c-41db-ab73-f61899617f92
Marti, Magali
8a7caa6d-4e6e-4677-bd31-feb317300f1f
Svensson, Bo H
3dd78f92-01ba-431e-9423-af89f895be49
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Veraart, Annelies J
7a3f3154-4edf-473c-b233-eeae50eb457b
Jassey, Vincent
f821a8ae-2435-41e8-9c4b-ef274b176b82

Robroek, Bjorn JM, Marti, Magali, Svensson, Bo H, Dumont, Marc, Veraart, Annelies J and Jassey, Vincent (2021) Rewiring of peatland plant–microbe networks outpaces species turnover. Oikos, 130 (3), 339-353. (doi:10.1111/oik.07635).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Enviro–climatic changes are thought to be causing alterations in ecosystem processes through shifts in plant and microbial communities; however, how links between plant and microbial communities change with enviro–climatic change is likely to be less straightforward but may be fundamental for many ecological processes. To address this, we assessed the composition of the plant community and the prokaryotic community – using amplicon‐based sequencing – of three European peatlands that were distinct in enviro–climatic conditions. Bipartite networks were used to construct site‐specific plant–prokaryote co‐occurrence networks. Our data show that between sites, plant and prokaryotic communities differ and that turnover in interactions between the communities was complex. Essentially, turnover in plant–microbial interactions is much faster than turnover in the respective communities. Our findings suggest that network rewiring does largely result from novel or different interactions between species common to all realised networks. Hence, turnover in network composition is largely driven by the establishment of new interactions between a core community of plants and microorganisms that are shared among all sites. Taken together our results indicate that plant–microbe associations are context dependent, and that changes in enviro–climatic conditions will likely lead to network rewiring. Integrating turnover in plant–microbe interactions into studies that assess the impact of enviro–climatic change on peatland ecosystems is essential to understand ecosystem dynamics and must be combined with studies on the impact of these changes on ecosystem processes.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 December 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 January 2021
Published date: March 2021
Keywords: 16S amplicon sequencing, 16S rRNA, bipartite networks, microbial and plant diversity, peatlands, plant–microbe interactions

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448415
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448415
ISSN: 0030-1299
PURE UUID: e7a7c979-6fd7-42e1-addc-c663ef28a5e4
ORCID for Bjorn JM Robroek: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6714-0652
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Apr 2021 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:09

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Contributors

Author: Bjorn JM Robroek ORCID iD
Author: Magali Marti
Author: Bo H Svensson
Author: Marc Dumont ORCID iD
Author: Annelies J Veraart
Author: Vincent Jassey

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