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Animals, protists and bacteria share marine biogeographic patterns

Animals, protists and bacteria share marine biogeographic patterns
Animals, protists and bacteria share marine biogeographic patterns
Over millennia, ecological and evolutionary mechanisms have shaped macroecological patterns across the tree of life. Research describing these patterns at both regional and global scales has traditionally focussed on the study of metazoan species. Consequently, there is a limited understanding of cross-phyla biogeographic structuring, and an escalating need to understand the macroecology of both microscopic and macroscopic organisms. Here we used environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding to explore the biodiversity of marine metazoans, protists and bacteria along an extensive and highly heterogeneous coastline. Our results showed remarkably consistent biogeographic structure across the kingdoms of life despite billions of years of evolution. Analyses investigating the drivers of these patterns for each taxonomic kingdom found that environmental conditions, such as temperature, and to a lesser extent, anthropogenic stressors such as fishing pressure and pollution, explained some of the observed variation. Additionally, metazoans displayed biographic patterns that suggested regional biotic homogenisation. Against the backdrop of global pervasive anthropogenic environmental change, our work highlights the importance of considering multiple domains of life to understand the maintenance and drivers of marine biodiversity patterns across broad taxonomic, ecological and geographical scales.
2397-334X
Holman, Luke Earl
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de Bruyn, Mark
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Creer, Simon
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Carvalho, Gary
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Robidart, Julie
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Rius, Marc
c4e88345-4b4e-4428-b4b2-37229155f68d
Holman, Luke Earl
3d57aba8-c261-413b-a053-e7bed35adba0
de Bruyn, Mark
bda81f81-e206-4d64-8a93-541e253d0497
Creer, Simon
d032cd75-9ed6-4bb8-b55b-926afb575321
Carvalho, Gary
fe03b393-a1af-4639-8a93-684e58d3434a
Robidart, Julie
a9b8d49c-c1e3-4a3b-a53c-685a0f2c7f93
Rius, Marc
c4e88345-4b4e-4428-b4b2-37229155f68d

Holman, Luke Earl, de Bruyn, Mark, Creer, Simon, Carvalho, Gary, Robidart, Julie and Rius, Marc (2021) Animals, protists and bacteria share marine biogeographic patterns. Nature Ecology & Evolution. (doi:10.1038/s41559-021-01439-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Over millennia, ecological and evolutionary mechanisms have shaped macroecological patterns across the tree of life. Research describing these patterns at both regional and global scales has traditionally focussed on the study of metazoan species. Consequently, there is a limited understanding of cross-phyla biogeographic structuring, and an escalating need to understand the macroecology of both microscopic and macroscopic organisms. Here we used environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding to explore the biodiversity of marine metazoans, protists and bacteria along an extensive and highly heterogeneous coastline. Our results showed remarkably consistent biogeographic structure across the kingdoms of life despite billions of years of evolution. Analyses investigating the drivers of these patterns for each taxonomic kingdom found that environmental conditions, such as temperature, and to a lesser extent, anthropogenic stressors such as fishing pressure and pollution, explained some of the observed variation. Additionally, metazoans displayed biographic patterns that suggested regional biotic homogenisation. Against the backdrop of global pervasive anthropogenic environmental change, our work highlights the importance of considering multiple domains of life to understand the maintenance and drivers of marine biodiversity patterns across broad taxonomic, ecological and geographical scales.

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Accepted/In Press date: 8 March 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 April 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448455
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448455
ISSN: 2397-334X
PURE UUID: 12661165-f92c-4b2b-ae79-6d5d3bfed691
ORCID for Luke Earl Holman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8139-3760

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Date deposited: 22 Apr 2021 16:47
Last modified: 16 Oct 2021 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Luke Earl Holman ORCID iD
Author: Mark de Bruyn
Author: Simon Creer
Author: Gary Carvalho
Author: Julie Robidart
Author: Marc Rius

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