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Data from: Trophic interactions of fish communities at midwater depths enhance long-term carbon storage and benthic production on continental slopes

Data from: Trophic interactions of fish communities at midwater depths enhance long-term carbon storage and benthic production on continental slopes
Data from: Trophic interactions of fish communities at midwater depths enhance long-term carbon storage and benthic production on continental slopes
Biological transfer of nutrients and materials between linked ecosystems influences global carbon budgets and ecosystem structure and function. Identifying the organisms or functional groups that are responsible for nutrient transfer, and quantifying their influence on ecosystem structure and carbon capture is an essential step for informed management of ecosystems in physically distant, but ecologically linked areas. Here, we combine natural abundance stable isotope tracers and survey data to show that mid-water and bentho-pelagic-feeding demersal fishes play an important role in the ocean carbon cycle, bypassing the detrital particle flux and transferring carbon to deep long-term storage. Global peaks in biomass and diversity of fishes at mid-slope depths are explained by competitive release of the demersal fish predators of mid-water organisms, which in turn support benthic fish production. Over 50% of the biomass of the demersal fish community at depths between 500 and 1800 m is supported by biological rather than detrital nutrient flux processes, and we estimate that bentho-pelagic fishes from the UK–Irish continental slope capture and store a volume of carbon equivalent to over 1 million tonnes of CO2 every year.,Trueman 2014 Fish Isotope dataStable isotope data (d13C PDB and d15N air) from white muscle tissue of fishes caught by demersal trawl on the Rockall trough. Associated data are: Species name, feeding type (benthic or benthopelagic), capture (trawl) depth in meters and fish mass in grammes,
DRYAD
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
Johnston, Graham
a2456997-f465-4109-a573-cc1597bec789
O'Hea, Brendan
ecdc6f09-905c-4ae0-a852-48781715f055
MacKenzie, Kirsteen M.
512f2b73-f8e4-4ab4-8d91-16c0a2084120
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
Johnston, Graham
a2456997-f465-4109-a573-cc1597bec789
O'Hea, Brendan
ecdc6f09-905c-4ae0-a852-48781715f055
MacKenzie, Kirsteen M.
512f2b73-f8e4-4ab4-8d91-16c0a2084120

(2014) Data from: Trophic interactions of fish communities at midwater depths enhance long-term carbon storage and benthic production on continental slopes. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.n576n [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Biological transfer of nutrients and materials between linked ecosystems influences global carbon budgets and ecosystem structure and function. Identifying the organisms or functional groups that are responsible for nutrient transfer, and quantifying their influence on ecosystem structure and carbon capture is an essential step for informed management of ecosystems in physically distant, but ecologically linked areas. Here, we combine natural abundance stable isotope tracers and survey data to show that mid-water and bentho-pelagic-feeding demersal fishes play an important role in the ocean carbon cycle, bypassing the detrital particle flux and transferring carbon to deep long-term storage. Global peaks in biomass and diversity of fishes at mid-slope depths are explained by competitive release of the demersal fish predators of mid-water organisms, which in turn support benthic fish production. Over 50% of the biomass of the demersal fish community at depths between 500 and 1800 m is supported by biological rather than detrital nutrient flux processes, and we estimate that bentho-pelagic fishes from the UK–Irish continental slope capture and store a volume of carbon equivalent to over 1 million tonnes of CO2 every year.,Trueman 2014 Fish Isotope dataStable isotope data (d13C PDB and d15N air) from white muscle tissue of fishes caught by demersal trawl on the Rockall trough. Associated data are: Species name, feeding type (benthic or benthopelagic), capture (trawl) depth in meters and fish mass in grammes,

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More information

Published date: 1 January 2014

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448458
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448458
PURE UUID: e1e4986e-6176-4877-85b7-959212a42985

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Apr 2021 16:47
Last modified: 22 Apr 2021 16:47

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Contributors

Contributor: Clive N. Trueman
Contributor: Graham Johnston
Contributor: Brendan O'Hea
Contributor: Kirsteen M. MacKenzie

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