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Data from: Temperature-dependent resetting of the molecular circadian oscillator in Drosophila.

Data from: Temperature-dependent resetting of the molecular circadian oscillator in Drosophila.
Data from: Temperature-dependent resetting of the molecular circadian oscillator in Drosophila.
Circadian clocks responsible for daily time keeping in a wide range of organisms synchronize to daily temperature cycles via pathways that remain poorly understood. To address this problem from the perspective of the molecular oscillator, we monitored temperature-dependent resetting of four of its core components in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster: the transcripts and proteins for the clock genes period (per) and timeless (tim). The molecular circadian cycle in adult heads exhibited parallel responses to temperature-mediated resetting at the levels of per transcript, tim transcript and TIM protein. Early phase adjustment specific to per transcript rhythms was explained by clock-independent temperature-driven transcription of per. The cold-induced expression of Drosophila per contrasts with the previously reported heat-induced regulation of mammalian Period 2. An altered and more readily re-entrainable temperature-synchronized circadian oscillator that featured temperature-driven per transcript rhythms and phase-shifted TIM and PER protein rhythms was found for flies of the ‘Tim 4’ genotype, which lacked daily tim transcript oscillations but maintained post-transcriptional temperature entrainment of tim expression. The accelerated molecular and behavioural temperature entrainment observed for Tim 4 flies indicates that clock-controlled tim expression constrains the rate of temperature cycle-mediated circadian resetting.,GodaSharpWijnen2014Fig13S2S3S5TabS2S3SPSS data file for the gene expression measures used for Figures 1,3,S2,S3,S5 and Tables S2,S3GodaSharpWijnenFig2Excel file containing the TopCount in vivo luciferase data plotted in Figure 2.GodaSharpWijnen2014FigS1SPSS data file containing the behavioural measures quantified in Figure S1.GodaSharpWijnen2014TabS1SPSS data files describing the circadian locomotor behaviour measures represented in Table S1.GodaSharpWijnen2014TabS4SPSS data file containing the circadian in vivo luminescence measures represented in Table S4,
DRYAD
Goda, Tadahiro
e630d6d8-4e4b-48e5-85ee-5a4f0e56c0d4
Sharp, Brandi
e38adb7b-8122-4c36-a6a8-08a8e2f16d0a
Wijnen, Herman
67e9bc5d-de6e-44ec-b4c2-50b67c5bc79d
Goda, Tadahiro
e630d6d8-4e4b-48e5-85ee-5a4f0e56c0d4
Sharp, Brandi
e38adb7b-8122-4c36-a6a8-08a8e2f16d0a
Wijnen, Herman
67e9bc5d-de6e-44ec-b4c2-50b67c5bc79d

Goda, Tadahiro and Sharp, Brandi (2014) Data from: Temperature-dependent resetting of the molecular circadian oscillator in Drosophila. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.7747n [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Circadian clocks responsible for daily time keeping in a wide range of organisms synchronize to daily temperature cycles via pathways that remain poorly understood. To address this problem from the perspective of the molecular oscillator, we monitored temperature-dependent resetting of four of its core components in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster: the transcripts and proteins for the clock genes period (per) and timeless (tim). The molecular circadian cycle in adult heads exhibited parallel responses to temperature-mediated resetting at the levels of per transcript, tim transcript and TIM protein. Early phase adjustment specific to per transcript rhythms was explained by clock-independent temperature-driven transcription of per. The cold-induced expression of Drosophila per contrasts with the previously reported heat-induced regulation of mammalian Period 2. An altered and more readily re-entrainable temperature-synchronized circadian oscillator that featured temperature-driven per transcript rhythms and phase-shifted TIM and PER protein rhythms was found for flies of the ‘Tim 4’ genotype, which lacked daily tim transcript oscillations but maintained post-transcriptional temperature entrainment of tim expression. The accelerated molecular and behavioural temperature entrainment observed for Tim 4 flies indicates that clock-controlled tim expression constrains the rate of temperature cycle-mediated circadian resetting.,GodaSharpWijnen2014Fig13S2S3S5TabS2S3SPSS data file for the gene expression measures used for Figures 1,3,S2,S3,S5 and Tables S2,S3GodaSharpWijnenFig2Excel file containing the TopCount in vivo luciferase data plotted in Figure 2.GodaSharpWijnen2014FigS1SPSS data file containing the behavioural measures quantified in Figure S1.GodaSharpWijnen2014TabS1SPSS data files describing the circadian locomotor behaviour measures represented in Table S1.GodaSharpWijnen2014TabS4SPSS data file containing the circadian in vivo luminescence measures represented in Table S4,

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More information

Published date: 1 January 2014

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448461
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448461
PURE UUID: caccb717-5937-4908-9c6e-a57a362b2614
ORCID for Herman Wijnen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8710-5176

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Apr 2021 16:47
Last modified: 23 Apr 2021 01:43

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Contributors

Creator: Tadahiro Goda
Creator: Brandi Sharp
Contributor: Herman Wijnen ORCID iD

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