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Supplementary Material: Surface Sediment Samples From Early Age of Seafloor Exploration Can Provide a Late 19th Century Baseline of the Marine Environment

Supplementary Material: Surface Sediment Samples From Early Age of Seafloor Exploration Can Provide a Late 19th Century Baseline of the Marine Environment
Supplementary Material: Surface Sediment Samples From Early Age of Seafloor Exploration Can Provide a Late 19th Century Baseline of the Marine Environment
Ocean-floor sediment samples collected up to 150 years ago represent an important historical archive to benchmark global changes in the seafloor environment, such as species' range shifts and pollution trends. Such benchmarking requires that the historical sediment samples represent the state of the environment at-or shortly before the time of collection. However, early oceanographic expeditions sampled the ocean floor using devices like the sounding tube or a dredge, which potentially disturb the sediment surface and recover a mix of Holocene (surface) and deeper, Pleistocene sediments. Here we use climate-sensitive microfossils as a fast biometric method to assess if historical seafloor samples contain a mixture of modern and glacial sediments. Our assessment is based on comparing the composition of planktonic foraminifera (PF) assemblages in historical samples with Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) global reference datasets. We show that eight out of the nine historical samples contain PF assemblages more similar to the Holocene than to the LGM PF assemblages, but the comparisons are only significant when there is a high local species' temporal turnover (from the LGM to the Holocene). When analysing temporal turnover globally, we show that upwelling and temperate regions had greatest species turnover, which are areas where our methodology would be most diagnostic. Our results suggest that sediment samples from historical collections can provide a baseline of the state of marine ecosystems in the late nineteenth century, and thus be used to assess ocean global change trends. ## Related materials: Rillo MC, Kucera M, Ezard THG and Miller CG (2019) Surface Sediment Samples From Early Age of Seafloor Exploration Can Provide a Late 19th Century Baseline of the Marine Environment. Front. Mar. Sci. 5:517. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2018.00517 Marina Costa Rillo (2016). Dataset: Henry Buckley Collection of Planktonic Foraminifera. Natural History Museum Data Portal (data.nhm.ac.uk). https://doi.org/10.5519/0035055
Natural History Museum
Marina Costa Rillo, Michal Kucera
07ef3ed2-cf06-4d61-8c10-1acd1420ff43
Kucera, Michal
60f5b0d0-b552-45f9-96c0-f4a7004643ba
Ezard, Thomas
a143a893-07d0-4673-a2dd-cea2cd7e1374
Giles Miller, C.
f09cadd2-512a-4e32-a5ec-d5708ead9949
Marina Costa Rillo, Michal Kucera
07ef3ed2-cf06-4d61-8c10-1acd1420ff43
Kucera, Michal
60f5b0d0-b552-45f9-96c0-f4a7004643ba
Ezard, Thomas
a143a893-07d0-4673-a2dd-cea2cd7e1374
Giles Miller, C.
f09cadd2-512a-4e32-a5ec-d5708ead9949

Kucera, Michal, Ezard, Thomas and Giles Miller, C. (2019) Supplementary Material: Surface Sediment Samples From Early Age of Seafloor Exploration Can Provide a Late 19th Century Baseline of the Marine Environment. Natural History Museum doi:10.5519/0001936 [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Ocean-floor sediment samples collected up to 150 years ago represent an important historical archive to benchmark global changes in the seafloor environment, such as species' range shifts and pollution trends. Such benchmarking requires that the historical sediment samples represent the state of the environment at-or shortly before the time of collection. However, early oceanographic expeditions sampled the ocean floor using devices like the sounding tube or a dredge, which potentially disturb the sediment surface and recover a mix of Holocene (surface) and deeper, Pleistocene sediments. Here we use climate-sensitive microfossils as a fast biometric method to assess if historical seafloor samples contain a mixture of modern and glacial sediments. Our assessment is based on comparing the composition of planktonic foraminifera (PF) assemblages in historical samples with Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) global reference datasets. We show that eight out of the nine historical samples contain PF assemblages more similar to the Holocene than to the LGM PF assemblages, but the comparisons are only significant when there is a high local species' temporal turnover (from the LGM to the Holocene). When analysing temporal turnover globally, we show that upwelling and temperate regions had greatest species turnover, which are areas where our methodology would be most diagnostic. Our results suggest that sediment samples from historical collections can provide a baseline of the state of marine ecosystems in the late nineteenth century, and thus be used to assess ocean global change trends. ## Related materials: Rillo MC, Kucera M, Ezard THG and Miller CG (2019) Surface Sediment Samples From Early Age of Seafloor Exploration Can Provide a Late 19th Century Baseline of the Marine Environment. Front. Mar. Sci. 5:517. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2018.00517 Marina Costa Rillo (2016). Dataset: Henry Buckley Collection of Planktonic Foraminifera. Natural History Museum Data Portal (data.nhm.ac.uk). https://doi.org/10.5519/0035055

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More information

Published date: 1 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448550
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448550
PURE UUID: c7779fa1-f631-4b3d-8778-ec9db3f4cbd7
ORCID for Thomas Ezard: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8305-6605

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Apr 2021 18:36
Last modified: 27 Apr 2021 01:45

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Contributors

Contributor: Michal Kucera Marina Costa Rillo
Creator: Michal Kucera
Creator: Thomas Ezard ORCID iD
Creator: C. Giles Miller

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