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Data from: Mapping beta diversity from space: Sparse Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM) for analysing high-dimensional data

Data from: Mapping beta diversity from space: Sparse Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM) for analysing high-dimensional data
Data from: Mapping beta diversity from space: Sparse Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM) for analysing high-dimensional data
1. Spatial patterns of community composition turnover (beta diversity) may be mapped through Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (GDM). While remote sensing data are adequate to describe these patterns, the often high-dimensional nature of these data poses some analytical challenges, potentially resulting in loss of generality. This may hinder the use of such data for mapping and monitoring beta-diversity patterns. 2. This study presents Sparse Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM), a methodological framework designed to improve the use of high-dimensional data to predict community turnover with GDM. SGDM consists of a two-stage approach, by first transforming the environmental data with a sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA), aimed at dealing with high-dimensional datasets, and secondly fitting the transformed data with GDM. The SCCA penalisation parameters are chosen according to a grid search procedure in order to optimise the predictive performance of a GDM fit on the resulting components. The proposed method was illustrated on a case study with a clear environmental gradient of shrub encroachment following cropland abandonment, and subsequent turnover in the bird communities. Bird community data, collected on 115 plots located along the described gradient, were used to fit composition dissimilarity as a function of several remote sensing datasets, including a time series of Landsat data as well as simulated EnMAP hyperspectral data. 3. The proposed approach always outperformed GDM models when fit on high-dimensional datasets. Its usage on low-dimensional data was not consistently advantageous. Models using high-dimensional data, on the other hand, always outperformed those using low-dimensional data, such as single date multispectral imagery. 4. This approach improved the direct use of high-dimensional remote sensing data, such as time series or hyperspectral imagery, for community dissimilarity modelling, resulting in better performing models. The good performance of models using high-dimensional datasets further highlights the relevance of dense time series and data coming from new and forthcoming satellite sensors for ecological applications such as mapping species beta diversity.,Species and environmental dataThis compiled (zip) file consists of 7 matrices of data: one species data matrix, with abundance observations per visited plot; and 6 environmental data matrices, consisting of land cover classification (Class), simulated EnMAP and Landsat data (April and August), and a 6 time-step Landsat time series (January, March, May, June, July and September). All data is compiled to the 125m radius plots, as described in the paper.Leitaoetal_Mapping beta diversity from space_Data.zip,
DRYAD
Leitão, Pedro J.
b906d7a2-6455-4de8-91ca-e48ef826e17e
Suess, Stefan
1d535fd8-c1a3-4d67-b62a-0687e5162200
Schwieder, Marcel
6964131c-e1a4-4cc9-977d-223a543b3115
Catry, Inês
e167f264-efbf-4b24-83cc-40863e3cf0fe
Milton, Edward
0c1cacec-0209-4e85-9ceb-e54415e1bde3
Moreira, Francisco
31d11c19-7252-451e-bece-e0cb4d163aaa
Osborne, Patrick E.
c4d4261d-557c-4179-a24e-cdd7a98fb2b8
Pinto, Manuel J.
4dcb2971-a6b7-4784-a0b1-8207a8ecc550
Van Der Linden, Sebastian
9fb83619-4f86-4d7f-add2-b03a548c4acf
Hostert, Patrick
f907ff23-59da-474f-8d20-5e2a2eb0c6e5
Milton, Edward J.
f6cb5c0d-a5d4-47d7-860f-096de08e0c24
Leitão, Pedro J.
b906d7a2-6455-4de8-91ca-e48ef826e17e
Suess, Stefan
1d535fd8-c1a3-4d67-b62a-0687e5162200
Schwieder, Marcel
6964131c-e1a4-4cc9-977d-223a543b3115
Catry, Inês
e167f264-efbf-4b24-83cc-40863e3cf0fe
Milton, Edward
0c1cacec-0209-4e85-9ceb-e54415e1bde3
Moreira, Francisco
31d11c19-7252-451e-bece-e0cb4d163aaa
Osborne, Patrick E.
c4d4261d-557c-4179-a24e-cdd7a98fb2b8
Pinto, Manuel J.
4dcb2971-a6b7-4784-a0b1-8207a8ecc550
Van Der Linden, Sebastian
9fb83619-4f86-4d7f-add2-b03a548c4acf
Hostert, Patrick
f907ff23-59da-474f-8d20-5e2a2eb0c6e5
Milton, Edward J.
f6cb5c0d-a5d4-47d7-860f-096de08e0c24

Suess, Stefan, Schwieder, Marcel, Catry, Inês, Moreira, Francisco, Van Der Linden, Sebastian and Hostert, Patrick (2016) Data from: Mapping beta diversity from space: Sparse Generalized Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM) for analysing high-dimensional data. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.ns7pv [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

1. Spatial patterns of community composition turnover (beta diversity) may be mapped through Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (GDM). While remote sensing data are adequate to describe these patterns, the often high-dimensional nature of these data poses some analytical challenges, potentially resulting in loss of generality. This may hinder the use of such data for mapping and monitoring beta-diversity patterns. 2. This study presents Sparse Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (SGDM), a methodological framework designed to improve the use of high-dimensional data to predict community turnover with GDM. SGDM consists of a two-stage approach, by first transforming the environmental data with a sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA), aimed at dealing with high-dimensional datasets, and secondly fitting the transformed data with GDM. The SCCA penalisation parameters are chosen according to a grid search procedure in order to optimise the predictive performance of a GDM fit on the resulting components. The proposed method was illustrated on a case study with a clear environmental gradient of shrub encroachment following cropland abandonment, and subsequent turnover in the bird communities. Bird community data, collected on 115 plots located along the described gradient, were used to fit composition dissimilarity as a function of several remote sensing datasets, including a time series of Landsat data as well as simulated EnMAP hyperspectral data. 3. The proposed approach always outperformed GDM models when fit on high-dimensional datasets. Its usage on low-dimensional data was not consistently advantageous. Models using high-dimensional data, on the other hand, always outperformed those using low-dimensional data, such as single date multispectral imagery. 4. This approach improved the direct use of high-dimensional remote sensing data, such as time series or hyperspectral imagery, for community dissimilarity modelling, resulting in better performing models. The good performance of models using high-dimensional datasets further highlights the relevance of dense time series and data coming from new and forthcoming satellite sensors for ecological applications such as mapping species beta diversity.,Species and environmental dataThis compiled (zip) file consists of 7 matrices of data: one species data matrix, with abundance observations per visited plot; and 6 environmental data matrices, consisting of land cover classification (Class), simulated EnMAP and Landsat data (April and August), and a 6 time-step Landsat time series (January, March, May, June, July and September). All data is compiled to the 125m radius plots, as described in the paper.Leitaoetal_Mapping beta diversity from space_Data.zip,

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More information

Published date: 1 January 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448554
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448554
PURE UUID: 76d7693e-4492-481b-a2c2-ec345b9b88bc
ORCID for Patrick E. Osborne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8919-5710

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Apr 2021 18:36
Last modified: 27 Apr 2021 01:39

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Contributors

Contributor: Pedro J. Leitão
Creator: Stefan Suess
Creator: Marcel Schwieder
Creator: Inês Catry
Contributor: Edward Milton
Creator: Francisco Moreira
Contributor: Patrick E. Osborne ORCID iD
Contributor: Manuel J. Pinto
Creator: Sebastian Van Der Linden
Creator: Patrick Hostert
Contributor: Edward J. Milton

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