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Invariant gametogenic response of dominant infaunal bivalves from the arctic under ambient and near-future climate change conditions

Invariant gametogenic response of dominant infaunal bivalves from the arctic under ambient and near-future climate change conditions
Invariant gametogenic response of dominant infaunal bivalves from the arctic under ambient and near-future climate change conditions

Arctic marine ecosystems are undergoing a series of major rapid adjustments to the regional amplification of climate change, but there is a paucity of knowledge about how changing environmental conditions might affect reproductive cycles of seafloor organisms. Shifts in species reproductive ecology may influence their entire life-cycle, and, ultimately, determine the persistence and distribution of taxa. Here, we investigate whether the combined effects of warming and ocean acidification based on near-future climate change projections affects the reproductive processes in benthic bivalves (Astarte crenata and Bathyarca glacialis) from the Barents Sea. Both species present large oocytes indicative of lecithotrophic or direct larval development after ∼4 months exposure to ambient [<2°C, ∼400 ppm (CO2)] and near-future [3–5°C, ∼550 ppm (CO2)] conditions, but we find no evidence that the combined effects of acidification and warming affect the size frequency distribution of oocytes. Whilst our observations are indicative of resilience of this reproductive stage to global changes, we also highlight that the successful progression of gametogenesis under standard laboratory conditions does not necessarily mean that successful development and recruitment will occur in the natural environment. This is because the metabolic costs of changing environmental conditions are likely to be offset by, as is common practice in laboratory experiments, feeding ad libitum. We discuss our findings in the context of changing food availability in the Arctic and conclude that, if we are to establish the vulnerability of species and ecosystems, there is a need for holistic approaches that incorporate multiple system responses to change.

dynamic energy-budget, functional response, life-history, metabolic plasticity, oogenesis
2296-7745
Reed, Adam J.
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Godbold, Jasmin A.
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Grange, Laura J.
8de65684-8e14-4cc2-89d1-ca20322714e4
Reed, Adam J.
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Godbold, Jasmin A.
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Grange, Laura J.
8de65684-8e14-4cc2-89d1-ca20322714e4

Reed, Adam J., Godbold, Jasmin A., Solan, Martin and Grange, Laura J. (2021) Invariant gametogenic response of dominant infaunal bivalves from the arctic under ambient and near-future climate change conditions. Frontiers in Marine Science, 8, [576746]. (doi:10.3389/fmars.2021.576746).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Arctic marine ecosystems are undergoing a series of major rapid adjustments to the regional amplification of climate change, but there is a paucity of knowledge about how changing environmental conditions might affect reproductive cycles of seafloor organisms. Shifts in species reproductive ecology may influence their entire life-cycle, and, ultimately, determine the persistence and distribution of taxa. Here, we investigate whether the combined effects of warming and ocean acidification based on near-future climate change projections affects the reproductive processes in benthic bivalves (Astarte crenata and Bathyarca glacialis) from the Barents Sea. Both species present large oocytes indicative of lecithotrophic or direct larval development after ∼4 months exposure to ambient [<2°C, ∼400 ppm (CO2)] and near-future [3–5°C, ∼550 ppm (CO2)] conditions, but we find no evidence that the combined effects of acidification and warming affect the size frequency distribution of oocytes. Whilst our observations are indicative of resilience of this reproductive stage to global changes, we also highlight that the successful progression of gametogenesis under standard laboratory conditions does not necessarily mean that successful development and recruitment will occur in the natural environment. This is because the metabolic costs of changing environmental conditions are likely to be offset by, as is common practice in laboratory experiments, feeding ad libitum. We discuss our findings in the context of changing food availability in the Arctic and conclude that, if we are to establish the vulnerability of species and ecosystems, there is a need for holistic approaches that incorporate multiple system responses to change.

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Accepted/In Press date: 1 February 2021
Published date: 25 February 2021
Additional Information: Funding Information: We thank the crew of cruise JR16006 and JR17007, RRS James Clark Ross, Robbie Robinson (University of Southampton) for assistance with the design of our experimental systems, Tom Williams and Matthew Carpenter-Liquorice for maintaining the experiments, and National Marine Facilities, Southampton and the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge for logistical support. Funding. This work was supported by ?The Changing Arctic Ocean Seafloor (ChAOS) ? how changing sea ice conditions impact biological communities, biogeochemical processes, and ecosystems? project (NE/N015894/1 and NE/P006426/1, 2017-2021) funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) in the United Kingdom. Publisher Copyright: © Copyright © 2021 Reed, Godbold, Solan and Grange. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: dynamic energy-budget, functional response, life-history, metabolic plasticity, oogenesis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448578
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448578
ISSN: 2296-7745
PURE UUID: e61068c0-2beb-415e-b247-6cda99132e88
ORCID for Adam J. Reed: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2200-5067
ORCID for Jasmin A. Godbold: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5558-8188
ORCID for Martin Solan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-5574
ORCID for Laura J. Grange: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9222-6848

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Apr 2021 16:43
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:01

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