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Data from: Stable isotope-based location in a shelf sea setting: accuracy and precision are comparable to light-based location methods

Data from: Stable isotope-based location in a shelf sea setting: accuracy and precision are comparable to light-based location methods
Data from: Stable isotope-based location in a shelf sea setting: accuracy and precision are comparable to light-based location methods
Retrospective determination of location for marine animals would facilitate investigations of migration, connectivity and food provenance. Predictable spatial variations in carbon and nitrogen isotopes in primary production across shelf seas provide a basis for stable isotope-based location. Here, we assess the accuracy and precision that can be obtained through dietary-isotope-based location methods. We build isoscapes from jellyfish tissues and use these to assign scallops of fixed and known individual location, and herring with well-understood population-level distributions in the North Sea. Accuracy and precision for retrospective isotope-based location in the North Sea were of a similar order to light-based location devices, with 75% of individual scallops assigned correctly to areas representing c. 30% of the North Sea, with a mean linear error on the order of 102 km. Applying assignment methods to an alternative migratory species (herring) resulted in ecologically realistic assignments consistent with fisheries survey data. Location methods based on dietary isotopes such as carbon and nitrogen recover the spatial origin of nutrients assimilated into tissues, and this may not correspond directly to the physical location if either the test animal or its prey is highly migratory. Stable isotope-based location can be applied to any marine-feeding organism or derived food product, but the ecological meaning of any assigned area will be more difficult to interpret for large, high trophic level, migratory animals with relatively slow isotopic assimilation rates.,TableS1 Stable isotope results C. capillataLatitude, Longitude, Weight, Bell diameter, stable isotope (d15N, d13C) and CN ratio for individual C. capillata sampled across the North Sea in Sept 2015TableS1.txtTableS2 Stable isotope data from herring from the North SeaLocations of capture (lat, long) and stable isotope (d13C d15N) values for herring caught across the North Sea in Sept. 2011TableS2.txtJennings.2001Stable isotope data (lipid corrected d13C, d15N) from queen scallops published in Jennings & Warr 2003 and Barnes et al., 2009,
Dryad Digital Repository
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
MacKenzie, Kirsteen M.
512f2b73-f8e4-4ab4-8d91-16c0a2084120
St John Glew, Katie
adc327c1-41ec-4018-9cb4-6db3d2f01913
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
MacKenzie, Kirsteen M.
512f2b73-f8e4-4ab4-8d91-16c0a2084120
St John Glew, Katie
adc327c1-41ec-4018-9cb4-6db3d2f01913

(2017) Data from: Stable isotope-based location in a shelf sea setting: accuracy and precision are comparable to light-based location methods. Dryad Digital Repository doi:10.5061/dryad.609hp [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Retrospective determination of location for marine animals would facilitate investigations of migration, connectivity and food provenance. Predictable spatial variations in carbon and nitrogen isotopes in primary production across shelf seas provide a basis for stable isotope-based location. Here, we assess the accuracy and precision that can be obtained through dietary-isotope-based location methods. We build isoscapes from jellyfish tissues and use these to assign scallops of fixed and known individual location, and herring with well-understood population-level distributions in the North Sea. Accuracy and precision for retrospective isotope-based location in the North Sea were of a similar order to light-based location devices, with 75% of individual scallops assigned correctly to areas representing c. 30% of the North Sea, with a mean linear error on the order of 102 km. Applying assignment methods to an alternative migratory species (herring) resulted in ecologically realistic assignments consistent with fisheries survey data. Location methods based on dietary isotopes such as carbon and nitrogen recover the spatial origin of nutrients assimilated into tissues, and this may not correspond directly to the physical location if either the test animal or its prey is highly migratory. Stable isotope-based location can be applied to any marine-feeding organism or derived food product, but the ecological meaning of any assigned area will be more difficult to interpret for large, high trophic level, migratory animals with relatively slow isotopic assimilation rates.,TableS1 Stable isotope results C. capillataLatitude, Longitude, Weight, Bell diameter, stable isotope (d15N, d13C) and CN ratio for individual C. capillata sampled across the North Sea in Sept 2015TableS1.txtTableS2 Stable isotope data from herring from the North SeaLocations of capture (lat, long) and stable isotope (d13C d15N) values for herring caught across the North Sea in Sept. 2011TableS2.txtJennings.2001Stable isotope data (lipid corrected d13C, d15N) from queen scallops published in Jennings & Warr 2003 and Barnes et al., 2009,

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More information

Published date: 26 August 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448619
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448619
PURE UUID: eae73363-0d85-444c-a2f8-dcd8a3e76f0c

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Date deposited: 28 Apr 2021 16:32
Last modified: 28 Apr 2021 16:36

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Contributors

Contributor: Clive N. Trueman
Contributor: Kirsteen M. MacKenzie
Contributor: Katie St John Glew

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