The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Data from: Exploring the universal ecological responses to climate change in a univoltine butterfly

Data from: Exploring the universal ecological responses to climate change in a univoltine butterfly
Data from: Exploring the universal ecological responses to climate change in a univoltine butterfly
1. Animals with distinct life stages are often exposed to different temperatures during each stage. Thus, how temperature affects these life stages should be considered for broadly understanding the ecological consequences of climate warming on such species. For example, temperature variation during particular life stages may affect respective change in body size, phenology and geographic range, which have been identified as the “universal” ecological responses to climate change. While each of these responses has been separately documented across a number of species, it is not known whether each response occurs together within a species. The influence of temperature during particular life stages may help explain each of these ecological responses to climate change. 2. Our goal was to determine if monthly temperature variation during particular life stages of a butterfly species can predict respective changes in body size and phenology. We also refer to the literature to assess if temperature variability during the adult stage influences range change over time. 3. Using historical museum collections paired with monthly temperature records, we show that changes in body size and phenology of the univoltine butterfly, Hesperia comma, are partly dependent upon temporal variation in summer temperatures during key stages of their life cycle. June temperatures, which are likely to affect growth rate of the final larval instar, are important for predicting adult body size (for males only; showing a positive relationship with temperature). July temperatures, which are likely to influence the pupal stage, are important for predicting the timing of adult emergence (showing a negative relationship with temperature). Previous studies show that August temperatures, which act on the adult stage, are linked to range change. 4. Our study highlights the importance of considering temperature variation during each life stage over historic time-scales for understanding intraspecific response to climate change. Range edge studies of ectothermic species that have annual life cycles, long time-series occurrence data, and associated temperature records (ideally at monthly resolutions) could be useful model systems for intraspecific tests of the universal ecological responses to climate change and for exploring interactive effects.,Fenberg_et_al.Sheet1: Male and Female wing length measurements and physical variables: mean, minimum, maximum temperature data and rainfall for March-September for the years of collection. Sheet2: 10th percentile and median collection dates and physical variables: mean, minimum, maximum temperature data and rainfall for March-September for the years of collection.,
DRYAD
Fenberg, Phillip B.
c73918cd-98cc-41e6-a18c-bf0de4f1ace8
Self, Angela
48bb713c-54ad-4bf9-a31f-d7a5232e63f2
Stewart, John R.
a1f39867-c680-4274-a33e-ee40fbe1d4cb
Wilson, Rebecca J.
3eb91ab1-d5c4-4f0c-a5d1-8944b536a296
Brooks, Stephen J.
a5c731e5-2874-46ca-a55c-1726dd3fcb22
Fenberg, Phillip B.
c73918cd-98cc-41e6-a18c-bf0de4f1ace8
Self, Angela
48bb713c-54ad-4bf9-a31f-d7a5232e63f2
Stewart, John R.
a1f39867-c680-4274-a33e-ee40fbe1d4cb
Wilson, Rebecca J.
3eb91ab1-d5c4-4f0c-a5d1-8944b536a296
Brooks, Stephen J.
a5c731e5-2874-46ca-a55c-1726dd3fcb22

Self, Angela, Stewart, John R. and Brooks, Stephen J. (2017) Data from: Exploring the universal ecological responses to climate change in a univoltine butterfly. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.r2250 [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

1. Animals with distinct life stages are often exposed to different temperatures during each stage. Thus, how temperature affects these life stages should be considered for broadly understanding the ecological consequences of climate warming on such species. For example, temperature variation during particular life stages may affect respective change in body size, phenology and geographic range, which have been identified as the “universal” ecological responses to climate change. While each of these responses has been separately documented across a number of species, it is not known whether each response occurs together within a species. The influence of temperature during particular life stages may help explain each of these ecological responses to climate change. 2. Our goal was to determine if monthly temperature variation during particular life stages of a butterfly species can predict respective changes in body size and phenology. We also refer to the literature to assess if temperature variability during the adult stage influences range change over time. 3. Using historical museum collections paired with monthly temperature records, we show that changes in body size and phenology of the univoltine butterfly, Hesperia comma, are partly dependent upon temporal variation in summer temperatures during key stages of their life cycle. June temperatures, which are likely to affect growth rate of the final larval instar, are important for predicting adult body size (for males only; showing a positive relationship with temperature). July temperatures, which are likely to influence the pupal stage, are important for predicting the timing of adult emergence (showing a negative relationship with temperature). Previous studies show that August temperatures, which act on the adult stage, are linked to range change. 4. Our study highlights the importance of considering temperature variation during each life stage over historic time-scales for understanding intraspecific response to climate change. Range edge studies of ectothermic species that have annual life cycles, long time-series occurrence data, and associated temperature records (ideally at monthly resolutions) could be useful model systems for intraspecific tests of the universal ecological responses to climate change and for exploring interactive effects.,Fenberg_et_al.Sheet1: Male and Female wing length measurements and physical variables: mean, minimum, maximum temperature data and rainfall for March-September for the years of collection. Sheet2: 10th percentile and median collection dates and physical variables: mean, minimum, maximum temperature data and rainfall for March-September for the years of collection.,

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 1 January 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448663
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448663
PURE UUID: 6c97cc0c-7f5c-422c-8306-287f203127be
ORCID for Rebecca J. Wilson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5705-6078

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Apr 2021 16:32
Last modified: 30 Apr 2021 01:31

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Contributor: Phillip B. Fenberg
Creator: Angela Self
Creator: John R. Stewart
Contributor: Rebecca J. Wilson ORCID iD
Creator: Stephen J. Brooks

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×