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Reframing project management process paralysis: an autoethnographic study of the UK fire service

Reframing project management process paralysis: an autoethnographic study of the UK fire service
Reframing project management process paralysis: an autoethnographic study of the UK fire service
The COVID-19 pandemic has created new social, environmental, and economic challenges for organisational routines, and a multilevel perspective of project management processes and decision making is required to untangle the complex nature of projects and phenomena. This research hence aims to investigate reframing of traditional project failure reasoning in pressurised situations by adopting a wider organisational view of the causation of failure using models from high-risk industries which support good decision-making practices and highlighting the project, programme and organisational structures which inherently position a project manager to fail in conditions with cognitive overload, limitations, and constraints. Through an institutional perspective, both individuals (the project managers) and organisations are considered under the influence of normative and cognitive pressures, and both are sources of change.
Project Management, Autoethnography, Fire Service, Process Paralysis, COVID-19, Institutional Theory
6
University of Southampton
Barber, Carl
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Dacre, Nicholas
90ea8d3e-d0b1-4a5a-bead-f95ab32afbd1
Dong, Hao
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Barber, Carl
9a1aa41e-21e2-4b4f-91f9-334294df6d29
Dacre, Nicholas
90ea8d3e-d0b1-4a5a-bead-f95ab32afbd1
Dong, Hao
73a03c20-d661-446a-b45e-d2cf9e556998

Barber, Carl, Dacre, Nicholas and Dong, Hao (2021) Reframing project management process paralysis: an autoethnographic study of the UK fire service (Advanced Project Management, 6, 21) University of Southampton

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has created new social, environmental, and economic challenges for organisational routines, and a multilevel perspective of project management processes and decision making is required to untangle the complex nature of projects and phenomena. This research hence aims to investigate reframing of traditional project failure reasoning in pressurised situations by adopting a wider organisational view of the causation of failure using models from high-risk industries which support good decision-making practices and highlighting the project, programme and organisational structures which inherently position a project manager to fail in conditions with cognitive overload, limitations, and constraints. Through an institutional perspective, both individuals (the project managers) and organisations are considered under the influence of normative and cognitive pressures, and both are sources of change.

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More information

Published date: 2021
Keywords: Project Management, Autoethnography, Fire Service, Process Paralysis, COVID-19, Institutional Theory

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448705
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448705
PURE UUID: 45a15170-a8ab-47be-817b-bc913d20dd6d
ORCID for Hao Dong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3458-4986

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Apr 2021 16:33
Last modified: 26 May 2022 01:57

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Contributors

Author: Carl Barber
Author: Nicholas Dacre
Author: Hao Dong ORCID iD

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