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Data from: An integrated framework to identify wildlife populations under threat from climate change

Data from: An integrated framework to identify wildlife populations under threat from climate change
Data from: An integrated framework to identify wildlife populations under threat from climate change
Climate change is a major threat to global biodiversity that will produce a range of new selection pressures. Understanding species responses to climate change requires an interdisciplinary perspective, combining ecological, molecular and environmental approaches. We propose an applied integrated framework to identify populations under threat from climate change based on their extent of exposure, inherent sensitivity due to adaptive and neutral genetic variation and range shift potential. We consider intraspecific vulnerability and population-level responses, an important but often neglected conservation research priority. We demonstrate how this framework can be applied to vertebrates with limited dispersal abilities using empirical data for the bat Plecotus austriacus. We use ecological niche modelling and environmental dissimilarity analysis to locate areas at high risk of exposure to future changes. Combining outlier tests with genotype-environment association analysis we identify potential climate-adaptive SNPs in our genomic dataset and differences in the frequency of adaptive and neutral variation between populations. We assess landscape connectivity and show that changing environmental suitability may limit the future movement of individuals, thus affecting both the ability of populations to shift their distribution to climatically suitable areas and the probability of evolutionary rescue through the spread of adaptive genetic variation among populations. Therefore a better understanding of movement ecology and landscape connectivity is needed for predicting population persistence under climate change. Our study highlights the importance of incorporating genomic data to determine sensitivity, adaptive potential and range shift potential, instead of relying solely on exposure to guide species vulnerability assessments and conservation planning.,Razgour17_MER_P_austriacus_SNP_data_filesddRAD-seq SNP dataset in Genepop, MAP-PED and Structure format.Razgour17_MER_Structure_outputsStructure and Structure Harvester output files for the Plecotus austriacus SNP dataset.Razgour17_MER_Maxent_outputsMaxent distribution modelling outputs for Plecotus austriacus under current and future (2070) conditions,
DRYAD
Razgour, Orly
107f4912-304a-44d5-99f8-cdf2a9ce6f14
Taggart, John B.
df3fd947-7411-4de3-b028-2c17d82fa2de
Manel, Stéphanie
5b5de36c-aeea-4ff2-8d3b-a91d2aab24b2
Juste, Javier
d44bbd1c-ec75-43f4-87e6-214729740e0e
Ibáñez, Carlos
69914ec1-fe65-4533-8887-6cd0c8d060a5
Rebelo, Hugo
81a4b2cf-7d26-4a69-974f-ea0854c33b0d
Alberdi, Antton
9811e238-964e-48e6-8bfb-b0a9d08a3f4a
Jones, Gareth
ef901572-2aa7-4a2a-9dd0-38e9ad894ca6
Park, Kirsty
6216e5a3-44f8-40cc-a30e-cc7a03713089
Razgour, Orly
107f4912-304a-44d5-99f8-cdf2a9ce6f14
Taggart, John B.
df3fd947-7411-4de3-b028-2c17d82fa2de
Manel, Stéphanie
5b5de36c-aeea-4ff2-8d3b-a91d2aab24b2
Juste, Javier
d44bbd1c-ec75-43f4-87e6-214729740e0e
Ibáñez, Carlos
69914ec1-fe65-4533-8887-6cd0c8d060a5
Rebelo, Hugo
81a4b2cf-7d26-4a69-974f-ea0854c33b0d
Alberdi, Antton
9811e238-964e-48e6-8bfb-b0a9d08a3f4a
Jones, Gareth
ef901572-2aa7-4a2a-9dd0-38e9ad894ca6
Park, Kirsty
6216e5a3-44f8-40cc-a30e-cc7a03713089

Juste, Javier, Ibáñez, Carlos, Rebelo, Hugo, Alberdi, Antton and Park, Kirsty (2017) Data from: An integrated framework to identify wildlife populations under threat from climate change. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.kv4g1 [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Climate change is a major threat to global biodiversity that will produce a range of new selection pressures. Understanding species responses to climate change requires an interdisciplinary perspective, combining ecological, molecular and environmental approaches. We propose an applied integrated framework to identify populations under threat from climate change based on their extent of exposure, inherent sensitivity due to adaptive and neutral genetic variation and range shift potential. We consider intraspecific vulnerability and population-level responses, an important but often neglected conservation research priority. We demonstrate how this framework can be applied to vertebrates with limited dispersal abilities using empirical data for the bat Plecotus austriacus. We use ecological niche modelling and environmental dissimilarity analysis to locate areas at high risk of exposure to future changes. Combining outlier tests with genotype-environment association analysis we identify potential climate-adaptive SNPs in our genomic dataset and differences in the frequency of adaptive and neutral variation between populations. We assess landscape connectivity and show that changing environmental suitability may limit the future movement of individuals, thus affecting both the ability of populations to shift their distribution to climatically suitable areas and the probability of evolutionary rescue through the spread of adaptive genetic variation among populations. Therefore a better understanding of movement ecology and landscape connectivity is needed for predicting population persistence under climate change. Our study highlights the importance of incorporating genomic data to determine sensitivity, adaptive potential and range shift potential, instead of relying solely on exposure to guide species vulnerability assessments and conservation planning.,Razgour17_MER_P_austriacus_SNP_data_filesddRAD-seq SNP dataset in Genepop, MAP-PED and Structure format.Razgour17_MER_Structure_outputsStructure and Structure Harvester output files for the Plecotus austriacus SNP dataset.Razgour17_MER_Maxent_outputsMaxent distribution modelling outputs for Plecotus austriacus under current and future (2070) conditions,

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More information

Published date: 1 January 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448817
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448817
PURE UUID: 29effc8a-6c46-4ebc-8a2d-28d79e98bac2
ORCID for Orly Razgour: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3186-0313

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 May 2021 16:31
Last modified: 07 May 2021 01:48

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Contributors

Contributor: Orly Razgour ORCID iD
Contributor: John B. Taggart
Contributor: Stéphanie Manel
Creator: Javier Juste
Creator: Carlos Ibáñez
Creator: Hugo Rebelo
Creator: Antton Alberdi
Contributor: Gareth Jones
Creator: Kirsty Park

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