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Data from: Replanting of first-cycle oil palm results in a second wave of biodiversity loss

Data from: Replanting of first-cycle oil palm results in a second wave of biodiversity loss
Data from: Replanting of first-cycle oil palm results in a second wave of biodiversity loss
1. Conversion of forest to oil palm plantations results in a significant loss of biodiversity. Despite this, first-cycle oil palm plantations can sustain relatively high biodiversity compared to other crops. However, the long-term effects of oil palm agriculture on flora and fauna are unknown. Oil palm has a 25-year commercial lifespan before it must be replanted, due to reduced productivity and difficulty of harvesting. Loss of the complex vegetation structure of oil palm plantations during the replanting process will likely have impacts on the ecosystem at a local and landscape scale. However, the effect of replanting on biodiversity is poorly understood. 2 Here, we investigate the effects of replanting oil palm on soil macrofauna communities. We assessed ordinal richness, abundance and community composition of soil macrofauna in first (25-27-years-old) and second-cycle oil palm (freshly cleared, 1-year-old, 3-year-old and 7-year-old mature). 3. Macrofauna abundance and richness drastically declined immediately after replanting. Macrofauna richness showed some recovery 7-years after replanting, but was still 19% lower than first-cycle oil palm. Macrofauna abundance recovered to similar levels to that of first-cycle oil palm plantations, one-year after replanting. This was mainly due to high ant abundance, possibly due to the increased understory vegetation as herbicides are not used at this age. However, there were subsequent declines in macrofauna abundance 3 and 7-years after replanting, resulting in a 59% drop in macrofauna abundance compared to first-cycle levels. Furthermore, soil macrofauna community composition in all ages of second-cycle oil palm was different to first-cycle plantations, with decomposers suffering particular declines. 4. After considerable biodiversity loss due to forest conversion for oil palm; belowground invertebrate communities suffer a second wave of biodiversity loss due to replanting. This is likely to have serious implications for soil invertebrate diversity and agricultural sustainability in oil palm landscapes, due to the vital ecosystem functions that soil macrofauna provide.,arthropod biodiversity oil palm replantingarthropod abundance by taxonomic group for first-cycle and second-cycle oil palm agesarthropodreplanting.csv,
DRYAD
Ashton-Butt, Adham
327a148f-4a26-45f2-9611-6b4378134e04
Willcock, Simon
89d9767e-8076-4b21-be9d-a964f5cc85d7
Purnomo, Dedi
5aba735b-0c09-4203-b498-6328a3ee8676
Wahyuningsih, Resti
fc30fd40-6d62-456f-ab2e-29473bebc9a2
Aryawan, Anak A.K.
234234fa-ebbf-4baf-b010-93f5e7c2ab0a
Hood, Amelia
56d8f3c7-8016-4675-b769-4b9432331ef7
Suhardi, Suhardi
2165f2c6-8efd-461f-827b-30bfe2e62c18
Naim, Mohammad
521dea1e-e7e4-4fd5-b9d6-3b739e44dbbb
Poppy, Guy M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Caliman, Jean-Pierre
0cbbd452-822a-4ef2-a092-508b75e3f27f
Peh, Kelvin S.-H
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Snaddon, Jake L.
31a601f7-c9b0-45e2-b59b-fda9a0c5a54b
Ashton-Butt, Adham
327a148f-4a26-45f2-9611-6b4378134e04
Willcock, Simon
89d9767e-8076-4b21-be9d-a964f5cc85d7
Purnomo, Dedi
5aba735b-0c09-4203-b498-6328a3ee8676
Wahyuningsih, Resti
fc30fd40-6d62-456f-ab2e-29473bebc9a2
Aryawan, Anak A.K.
234234fa-ebbf-4baf-b010-93f5e7c2ab0a
Hood, Amelia
56d8f3c7-8016-4675-b769-4b9432331ef7
Suhardi, Suhardi
2165f2c6-8efd-461f-827b-30bfe2e62c18
Naim, Mohammad
521dea1e-e7e4-4fd5-b9d6-3b739e44dbbb
Poppy, Guy M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Caliman, Jean-Pierre
0cbbd452-822a-4ef2-a092-508b75e3f27f
Peh, Kelvin S.-H
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Snaddon, Jake L.
31a601f7-c9b0-45e2-b59b-fda9a0c5a54b

Purnomo, Dedi, Wahyuningsih, Resti, Hood, Amelia, Naim, Mohammad and Caliman, Jean-Pierre (2019) Data from: Replanting of first-cycle oil palm results in a second wave of biodiversity loss. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.k14t77p [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

1. Conversion of forest to oil palm plantations results in a significant loss of biodiversity. Despite this, first-cycle oil palm plantations can sustain relatively high biodiversity compared to other crops. However, the long-term effects of oil palm agriculture on flora and fauna are unknown. Oil palm has a 25-year commercial lifespan before it must be replanted, due to reduced productivity and difficulty of harvesting. Loss of the complex vegetation structure of oil palm plantations during the replanting process will likely have impacts on the ecosystem at a local and landscape scale. However, the effect of replanting on biodiversity is poorly understood. 2 Here, we investigate the effects of replanting oil palm on soil macrofauna communities. We assessed ordinal richness, abundance and community composition of soil macrofauna in first (25-27-years-old) and second-cycle oil palm (freshly cleared, 1-year-old, 3-year-old and 7-year-old mature). 3. Macrofauna abundance and richness drastically declined immediately after replanting. Macrofauna richness showed some recovery 7-years after replanting, but was still 19% lower than first-cycle oil palm. Macrofauna abundance recovered to similar levels to that of first-cycle oil palm plantations, one-year after replanting. This was mainly due to high ant abundance, possibly due to the increased understory vegetation as herbicides are not used at this age. However, there were subsequent declines in macrofauna abundance 3 and 7-years after replanting, resulting in a 59% drop in macrofauna abundance compared to first-cycle levels. Furthermore, soil macrofauna community composition in all ages of second-cycle oil palm was different to first-cycle plantations, with decomposers suffering particular declines. 4. After considerable biodiversity loss due to forest conversion for oil palm; belowground invertebrate communities suffer a second wave of biodiversity loss due to replanting. This is likely to have serious implications for soil invertebrate diversity and agricultural sustainability in oil palm landscapes, due to the vital ecosystem functions that soil macrofauna provide.,arthropod biodiversity oil palm replantingarthropod abundance by taxonomic group for first-cycle and second-cycle oil palm agesarthropodreplanting.csv,

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Published date: 1 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448825
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448825
PURE UUID: fd9bdbc1-3502-4126-b8ce-bf12c5c581b0
ORCID for Kelvin S.-H Peh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2921-1341
ORCID for Jake L. Snaddon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3549-5472

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 May 2021 16:31
Last modified: 07 May 2021 01:46

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Contributors

Contributor: Adham Ashton-Butt
Contributor: Simon Willcock
Creator: Dedi Purnomo
Creator: Resti Wahyuningsih
Contributor: Anak A.K. Aryawan
Creator: Amelia Hood
Contributor: Suhardi Suhardi
Creator: Mohammad Naim
Contributor: Guy M. Poppy
Creator: Jean-Pierre Caliman
Contributor: Kelvin S.-H Peh ORCID iD
Contributor: Jake L. Snaddon ORCID iD

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