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Encapsulation process and materials evaluation for E-textile gas sensor

Encapsulation process and materials evaluation for E-textile gas sensor
Encapsulation process and materials evaluation for E-textile gas sensor
The degree of pollution in the environment increases because of the vehicular emissions such as carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gases. To minimize the exposure levels, it is necessary for individuals to be able to determine for themselves the pollution levels of the environments they are in so that they can take the necessary precautions. Textile-based gas sensors are an emerging solution and this paper furthers the concept by investigating a novel method for encapsulating gas sensors in textiles. While encapsulation is required to improve the durability and lifetime of the sensors, it essential for their operation that the encapsulants do not reduce the sensitivity of the gas sensor. This paper investigates the selectivity of two different flexible and breathable thermoplastic encapsulants (Platilon®U and Zitex G-104) for sensing carbon monoxide by observing the sensor response with and without the encapsulants. Results show that while the encapsulants both enable the sensor to still function, Platilon®U reduces the sensor sensitivity, whereas Zitex G-104 has very little effect.
Valavan, Ashwini
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Komolafe, Abiodun
5e79fbab-38be-4a64-94d5-867a94690932
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Valavan, Ashwini
1e45c83e-c4f5-4ec8-9546-503ba213f44f
Komolafe, Abiodun
5e79fbab-38be-4a64-94d5-867a94690932
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d

Valavan, Ashwini, Komolafe, Abiodun, Harris, Nicholas and Beeby, Stephen (2019) Encapsulation process and materials evaluation for E-textile gas sensor. International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles (E-TEXTILES 2019), , London, United Kingdom. 12 Nov 2019. 5 pp . (doi:10.3390/proceedings2019032008).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The degree of pollution in the environment increases because of the vehicular emissions such as carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gases. To minimize the exposure levels, it is necessary for individuals to be able to determine for themselves the pollution levels of the environments they are in so that they can take the necessary precautions. Textile-based gas sensors are an emerging solution and this paper furthers the concept by investigating a novel method for encapsulating gas sensors in textiles. While encapsulation is required to improve the durability and lifetime of the sensors, it essential for their operation that the encapsulants do not reduce the sensitivity of the gas sensor. This paper investigates the selectivity of two different flexible and breathable thermoplastic encapsulants (Platilon®U and Zitex G-104) for sensing carbon monoxide by observing the sensor response with and without the encapsulants. Results show that while the encapsulants both enable the sensor to still function, Platilon®U reduces the sensor sensitivity, whereas Zitex G-104 has very little effect.

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More information

Published date: 4 December 2019
Venue - Dates: International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles (E-TEXTILES 2019), , London, United Kingdom, 2019-11-12 - 2019-11-12

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448888
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448888
PURE UUID: d0c9a211-963d-43bb-98aa-44b455bef22f
ORCID for Nicholas Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4122-2219
ORCID for Stephen Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

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Date deposited: 10 May 2021 16:30
Last modified: 11 May 2021 01:35

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