The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Data from: The challenges of detecting subtle population structure and its importance for the conservation of emperor penguins

Data from: The challenges of detecting subtle population structure and its importance for the conservation of emperor penguins
Data from: The challenges of detecting subtle population structure and its importance for the conservation of emperor penguins
Understanding the boundaries of breeding populations is of great importance for conservation efforts and estimates of extinction risk for threatened species. However, determining these boundaries can be difficult when population structure is subtle. Emperor penguins are highly reliant on sea ice, and some populations may be in jeopardy as climate change alters sea-ice extent and quality. An understanding of emperor penguin population structure is therefore urgently needed. Two previous studies have differed in their conclusions, particularly whether the Ross Sea, a major stronghold for the species, is isolated or not. We assessed emperor penguin population structure using 4,596 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), characterized in 110 individuals (10–16 per colony) from eight colonies around Antarctica. In contrast to a previous conclusion that emperor penguins are panmictic around the entire continent, we find that emperor penguins comprise at least four metapopulations, and that the Ross Sea is clearly a distinct metapopulation. Using larger sample sizes and a thorough assessment of the limitations of different analytical methods, we have shown that population structure within emperor penguins does exist and argue that its recognition is vital for the effective conservation of the species. We discuss the many difficulties that molecular ecologists and managers face in the detection and interpretation of subtle population structure using large SNP data sets, and argue that subtle structure should be taken into account when determining management strategies for threatened species, until accurate estimates of demographic connectivity among populations can be made.,Emperor penguin neutral SNP datasetEP_final.vcf,
DRYAD
Younger, Jane L.
deea6329-2600-4dfa-a47e-8ac1dd2010e1
Clucas, Gemma V.
01c99eb2-5dbb-4f55-847c-1283065b40e1
Kao, Damian
56c3666c-222c-4d19-98b3-958d3fecc0bd
Rogers, Alex D.
fb474198-f059-48f7-b637-74617b5023f6
Gharbi, Karim
9715391a-8b72-4075-9ca3-3176f5c66b09
Hart, Tom
de3eadf1-5833-4bdd-ba26-c608ed0eb206
Miller, Karen J.
1373f20a-8197-4354-9dd0-ccbcd8e0744d
Younger, Jane L.
deea6329-2600-4dfa-a47e-8ac1dd2010e1
Clucas, Gemma V.
01c99eb2-5dbb-4f55-847c-1283065b40e1
Kao, Damian
56c3666c-222c-4d19-98b3-958d3fecc0bd
Rogers, Alex D.
fb474198-f059-48f7-b637-74617b5023f6
Gharbi, Karim
9715391a-8b72-4075-9ca3-3176f5c66b09
Hart, Tom
de3eadf1-5833-4bdd-ba26-c608ed0eb206
Miller, Karen J.
1373f20a-8197-4354-9dd0-ccbcd8e0744d

Younger, Jane L., Kao, Damian, Rogers, Alex D., Gharbi, Karim, Hart, Tom and Miller, Karen J. (2017) Data from: The challenges of detecting subtle population structure and its importance for the conservation of emperor penguins. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.4s7t3 [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Understanding the boundaries of breeding populations is of great importance for conservation efforts and estimates of extinction risk for threatened species. However, determining these boundaries can be difficult when population structure is subtle. Emperor penguins are highly reliant on sea ice, and some populations may be in jeopardy as climate change alters sea-ice extent and quality. An understanding of emperor penguin population structure is therefore urgently needed. Two previous studies have differed in their conclusions, particularly whether the Ross Sea, a major stronghold for the species, is isolated or not. We assessed emperor penguin population structure using 4,596 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), characterized in 110 individuals (10–16 per colony) from eight colonies around Antarctica. In contrast to a previous conclusion that emperor penguins are panmictic around the entire continent, we find that emperor penguins comprise at least four metapopulations, and that the Ross Sea is clearly a distinct metapopulation. Using larger sample sizes and a thorough assessment of the limitations of different analytical methods, we have shown that population structure within emperor penguins does exist and argue that its recognition is vital for the effective conservation of the species. We discuss the many difficulties that molecular ecologists and managers face in the detection and interpretation of subtle population structure using large SNP data sets, and argue that subtle structure should be taken into account when determining management strategies for threatened species, until accurate estimates of demographic connectivity among populations can be made.,Emperor penguin neutral SNP datasetEP_final.vcf,

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 1 January 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448923
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448923
PURE UUID: 4f8ed973-108f-4585-b1ce-2f4b346fb82c
ORCID for Gemma V. Clucas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4305-1719

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 May 2021 16:33
Last modified: 25 Feb 2022 18:21

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Creator: Jane L. Younger
Contributor: Gemma V. Clucas ORCID iD
Creator: Damian Kao
Creator: Alex D. Rogers
Creator: Karim Gharbi
Creator: Tom Hart
Creator: Karen J. Miller

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×