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The imprint of windblown dust from the North American Southwest on the California Channel Islands and Pacific Ocean sediments

The imprint of windblown dust from the North American Southwest on the California Channel Islands and Pacific Ocean sediments
The imprint of windblown dust from the North American Southwest on the California Channel Islands and Pacific Ocean sediments
Climate projections for the North American Southwest (NASW) predict an increasing frequency and duration of droughts over the 21st century in response to human-induced warming, with potentially severe economic and social consequences. The geological record provides a way to contextualise this prediction because of the past occurrence of abrupt hemispheric warming events and sustained intervals of atmospheric carbon dioxide loading equivalent to those projected for AD 2100 (between ∼500 and 900 ppmv). Yet, terrestrial climate archives are typically too short and incomplete to provide a full record of these events. In principle, drill cores from deep sea sediments in the eastern Pacific Ocean can be used to overcome this problem because they contain long records of continental dust and distal riverine-supplied sediments from North America. Yet our limited understanding of the provenance and transport pathways of these sediments impedes use of these marine archives for this purpose. Here we present radiogenic isotope data (Sr, Nd and Pb) from known NASW dust-producing hot spots – playa lakes in the Mojave Desert, Quaternary silts mantling the California Channel Islands and the terrigenous fraction from marine sediments of the eastern Pacific Ocean, supported by new maps of bedrock isotopic composition in the NASW. We use these and published data sets to infer the origin of playa lake silts in the Mojave Desert and the source of windblown sediments to the California Channel Islands and nearby ocean basins. Our Results rule out a significant contribution from the distal tails of either the Pacific Asian dust plume or the North African dust plume to the Quaternary Channel Island silt mantles, corroborating the suggestion that they are aeolian in origin and sourced from the NASW on the Santa Ana winds. We identify the Outer California Borderland basins as an attractive proposition for studying past dust flux and palaeoaridity in the North American Southwest.
North America, Paleoclimatology, Present, Quaternary, Radiogenic isotopes
0277-3791
Jardine, G.e.
f7bad640-4292-4262-92ff-5cbdbbbc602b
Crocker, A.j.
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Bailey, I.
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Cooper, M.J.
54f7bff0-1f8c-4835-8358-71eef8529e7a
Milton, J.A.
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Wilson, P.A.
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Jardine, G.e.
f7bad640-4292-4262-92ff-5cbdbbbc602b
Crocker, A.j.
49f1d398-25e9-4729-9ef9-f477c8fb122f
Bailey, I.
5a855cfd-3c7c-4eab-9f50-951f9ca6e708
Cooper, M.J.
54f7bff0-1f8c-4835-8358-71eef8529e7a
Milton, J.A.
9e183221-d0d4-4ddb-aeba-0fdde9d31230
Wilson, P.A.
f940a9f0-fa5a-4a64-9061-f0794bfbf7c6

Jardine, G.e., Crocker, A.j., Bailey, I., Cooper, M.J., Milton, J.A. and Wilson, P.A. (2021) The imprint of windblown dust from the North American Southwest on the California Channel Islands and Pacific Ocean sediments. Quaternary Science Reviews, 261, [106934]. (doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2021.106934).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Climate projections for the North American Southwest (NASW) predict an increasing frequency and duration of droughts over the 21st century in response to human-induced warming, with potentially severe economic and social consequences. The geological record provides a way to contextualise this prediction because of the past occurrence of abrupt hemispheric warming events and sustained intervals of atmospheric carbon dioxide loading equivalent to those projected for AD 2100 (between ∼500 and 900 ppmv). Yet, terrestrial climate archives are typically too short and incomplete to provide a full record of these events. In principle, drill cores from deep sea sediments in the eastern Pacific Ocean can be used to overcome this problem because they contain long records of continental dust and distal riverine-supplied sediments from North America. Yet our limited understanding of the provenance and transport pathways of these sediments impedes use of these marine archives for this purpose. Here we present radiogenic isotope data (Sr, Nd and Pb) from known NASW dust-producing hot spots – playa lakes in the Mojave Desert, Quaternary silts mantling the California Channel Islands and the terrigenous fraction from marine sediments of the eastern Pacific Ocean, supported by new maps of bedrock isotopic composition in the NASW. We use these and published data sets to infer the origin of playa lake silts in the Mojave Desert and the source of windblown sediments to the California Channel Islands and nearby ocean basins. Our Results rule out a significant contribution from the distal tails of either the Pacific Asian dust plume or the North African dust plume to the Quaternary Channel Island silt mantles, corroborating the suggestion that they are aeolian in origin and sourced from the NASW on the Santa Ana winds. We identify the Outer California Borderland basins as an attractive proposition for studying past dust flux and palaeoaridity in the North American Southwest.

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Microsoft Word - JQSR-D-20-00566 manuscript for PURE - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 5 May 2022.
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Accepted/In Press date: 4 April 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 May 2021
Published date: 1 June 2021
Keywords: North America, Paleoclimatology, Present, Quaternary, Radiogenic isotopes

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448955
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448955
ISSN: 0277-3791
PURE UUID: 7cd9f8b9-a45d-451c-8aa1-775bb845b45f
ORCID for G.e. Jardine: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5778-6487
ORCID for M.J. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2130-2759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 May 2021 17:11
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:44

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Contributors

Author: G.e. Jardine ORCID iD
Author: A.j. Crocker
Author: I. Bailey
Author: M.J. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: J.A. Milton
Author: P.A. Wilson

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