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Investigating the response of steel structure to multi-axis, long duration blast and thermal loading

Investigating the response of steel structure to multi-axis, long duration blast and thermal loading
Investigating the response of steel structure to multi-axis, long duration blast and thermal loading
Arising in the far-field of large explosions, long duration blast events are typically defined as having a positive phase duration in excess of 40ms. Capable of engulfing entire buildings, long duration blast waves can result in significant damage to a multitude of compression elements, potentially leading to total structural collapse. Current guidelines provide simple empirical methods for estimating peak response and damage state of a column to blast loading. These methods neglect more complex situations such as non-orthogonal structural orientation, combined blast and thermal loading or column position within a frame: all requiring extensive experimentation or numerical modelling to determine a damage state.

In this thesis, multi-axis, thermal and frame interaction effects on the structural response of a column to long duration blast were explored. One phase of experimental testing improved the understanding of explosive thermal energy application to I-section surfaces. Another phase of testing explored the response of partially-clad frames to long duration blast utilising experimental findings, an extensive numerical study was undertaken, exploring the response of a column to large scale blast events including combinations of all three effects. Results were quantified and consolidated into a series of end-user charts, akin to those found in the current design standards. These charts provide a quick and simple means of estimating the maximum displacement and corresponding damage state of a column to long duration blast with multi-axis, thermal and frame interaction effects: reducing future requirement for experimental testing and numerical modelling. Findings indicated that a combination of all effects can have a detrimental impact on response, in some cases increasing damage state from minor to total destruction and collapse for the same column to the same blast event.
University of Southampton
Cannon, Laura
547400f7-1e7d-42b2-9c8a-35041a6a768e
Cannon, Laura
547400f7-1e7d-42b2-9c8a-35041a6a768e
Clubley, Simon K.
d3217801-61eb-480d-a6a7-5873b5f6f0fd

Cannon, Laura (2020) Investigating the response of steel structure to multi-axis, long duration blast and thermal loading. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 618pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Arising in the far-field of large explosions, long duration blast events are typically defined as having a positive phase duration in excess of 40ms. Capable of engulfing entire buildings, long duration blast waves can result in significant damage to a multitude of compression elements, potentially leading to total structural collapse. Current guidelines provide simple empirical methods for estimating peak response and damage state of a column to blast loading. These methods neglect more complex situations such as non-orthogonal structural orientation, combined blast and thermal loading or column position within a frame: all requiring extensive experimentation or numerical modelling to determine a damage state.

In this thesis, multi-axis, thermal and frame interaction effects on the structural response of a column to long duration blast were explored. One phase of experimental testing improved the understanding of explosive thermal energy application to I-section surfaces. Another phase of testing explored the response of partially-clad frames to long duration blast utilising experimental findings, an extensive numerical study was undertaken, exploring the response of a column to large scale blast events including combinations of all three effects. Results were quantified and consolidated into a series of end-user charts, akin to those found in the current design standards. These charts provide a quick and simple means of estimating the maximum displacement and corresponding damage state of a column to long duration blast with multi-axis, thermal and frame interaction effects: reducing future requirement for experimental testing and numerical modelling. Findings indicated that a combination of all effects can have a detrimental impact on response, in some cases increasing damage state from minor to total destruction and collapse for the same column to the same blast event.

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Published date: December 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 448995
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/448995
PURE UUID: 159957d8-8b84-4590-9364-c86a966b7c7b
ORCID for Laura Cannon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6421-7298
ORCID for Simon K. Clubley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3779-242X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 May 2021 16:30
Last modified: 14 May 2021 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Laura Cannon ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Simon K. Clubley ORCID iD

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