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3D-bioengineered model of human skeletal muscle tissue with phenotypic features of aging for drug testing purposes

3D-bioengineered model of human skeletal muscle tissue with phenotypic features of aging for drug testing purposes
3D-bioengineered model of human skeletal muscle tissue with phenotypic features of aging for drug testing purposes
Three-dimensional engineering of skeletal muscle is becoming increasingly relevant for tissue engineering, disease modeling and bio-hybrid robotics, where flexible, versatile and multidisciplinary approaches for the evaluation of tissue differentiation, functionality and force measurement are required. This works presents a 3D-printed platform of bioengineered human skeletal muscle which can efficiently model the three-dimensional structure of native tissue, while providing information about force generation and contraction profiles. Proper differentiation and maturation of myocytes is demonstrated by the expression of key myo-proteins using immunocytochemistry and analyzed by confocal microscopy, and the functionality assessed via electrical stimulation and analysis of contraction kinetics. To validate the flexibility of this platform for complex tissue modeling, the bioengineered muscle is treated with tumor necrosis factor α to mimic the conditions of aging, which is supported by morphological and functional changes. Moreover, as a proof of concept, the effects of Argireline® Amplified peptide, a cosmetic ingredient that causes muscle relaxation, are evaluated in both healthy and aged tissue models. Therefore, the results demonstrate that this 3D-bioengineered human muscle platform could be used to assess morphological and functional changes in the aging process of muscular tissue with potential applications in biomedicine, cosmetics and bio-hybrid robotics.
3D bioprinting, Bio-actuator, Drug testing, Human skeletal muscle, Muscle ageing
1758-5082
Mestre, Rafael
33721a01-ab1a-4f71-8b0e-abef8afc92f3
García, Nerea
a960baed-df78-4da2-8afc-2cc2ac349268
Patiño, Tania
efac661c-e5d3-4619-8cd9-db82f392683a
Guix, Maria
1d56db95-bdea-49d3-9361-0417b8e53975
Fuentes, Judith
c42e3685-cc15-4ed0-9226-f6a515fac8ef
Valerio-Santiago, Mauricio
be6dbd68-6276-46b9-b698-b3743b6d59a1
Almiñana, Núria
0ee24b2a-105d-47a5-b5a5-407d5f48565b
Sánchez, Samuel
21f41564-f601-4df1-b6a5-3f8138911958
Mestre, Rafael
33721a01-ab1a-4f71-8b0e-abef8afc92f3
García, Nerea
a960baed-df78-4da2-8afc-2cc2ac349268
Patiño, Tania
efac661c-e5d3-4619-8cd9-db82f392683a
Guix, Maria
1d56db95-bdea-49d3-9361-0417b8e53975
Fuentes, Judith
c42e3685-cc15-4ed0-9226-f6a515fac8ef
Valerio-Santiago, Mauricio
be6dbd68-6276-46b9-b698-b3743b6d59a1
Almiñana, Núria
0ee24b2a-105d-47a5-b5a5-407d5f48565b
Sánchez, Samuel
21f41564-f601-4df1-b6a5-3f8138911958

Mestre, Rafael, García, Nerea, Patiño, Tania, Guix, Maria, Fuentes, Judith, Valerio-Santiago, Mauricio, Almiñana, Núria and Sánchez, Samuel (2021) 3D-bioengineered model of human skeletal muscle tissue with phenotypic features of aging for drug testing purposes. Biofabrication, 13 (4), [045011]. (doi:10.1101/2020.06.18.158659).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Three-dimensional engineering of skeletal muscle is becoming increasingly relevant for tissue engineering, disease modeling and bio-hybrid robotics, where flexible, versatile and multidisciplinary approaches for the evaluation of tissue differentiation, functionality and force measurement are required. This works presents a 3D-printed platform of bioengineered human skeletal muscle which can efficiently model the three-dimensional structure of native tissue, while providing information about force generation and contraction profiles. Proper differentiation and maturation of myocytes is demonstrated by the expression of key myo-proteins using immunocytochemistry and analyzed by confocal microscopy, and the functionality assessed via electrical stimulation and analysis of contraction kinetics. To validate the flexibility of this platform for complex tissue modeling, the bioengineered muscle is treated with tumor necrosis factor α to mimic the conditions of aging, which is supported by morphological and functional changes. Moreover, as a proof of concept, the effects of Argireline® Amplified peptide, a cosmetic ingredient that causes muscle relaxation, are evaluated in both healthy and aged tissue models. Therefore, the results demonstrate that this 3D-bioengineered human muscle platform could be used to assess morphological and functional changes in the aging process of muscular tissue with potential applications in biomedicine, cosmetics and bio-hybrid robotics.

Text
2020.06.18.158659v2.full - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 10 March 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 March 2021
Published date: October 2021
Keywords: 3D bioprinting, Bio-actuator, Drug testing, Human skeletal muscle, Muscle ageing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 449043
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/449043
ISSN: 1758-5082
PURE UUID: 17c00548-a0b5-4a28-b887-fac13e4c465a
ORCID for Rafael Mestre: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2460-4234

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 May 2021 16:42
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 02:29

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Contributors

Author: Rafael Mestre ORCID iD
Author: Nerea García
Author: Tania Patiño
Author: Maria Guix
Author: Judith Fuentes
Author: Mauricio Valerio-Santiago
Author: Núria Almiñana
Author: Samuel Sánchez

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