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Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc

Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc
Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc
Climate change, fisheries pressure on penguin prey, and direct human disturbance of wildlife have all been implicated in causing large shifts in the abundance and distribution of penguins in the Southern Ocean. Without mark-recapture studies, understanding how colonies form and, by extension, how ranges shift is challenging. Genetic studies, particularly focused on newly established colonies, provide a snapshot of colonisation and can reveal the extent to which shifts in abundance and occupancy result from changes in demographic rates (e.g., reproduction and survival) or migration among suitable patches of habitat. Here we describe the population structure of a colonial seabird breeding across a large latitudinal range in the Southern Ocean. Using multilocus microsatellite genotype data from 510 Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) individuals from 14 colonies along the Scotia Arc and Antarctic Peninsula, together with mitochondrial DNA data, we find strong genetic differentiation between colonies north and south of the Polar Front, that coincides geographically with the taxonomic boundary separating the subspecies P. p. papua and P. p. ellsworthii. Using a discrete Bayesian phylogeographic approach, we show that southern Gentoos expanded from a possible glacial refuge in the centre of their current range, colonising regions to the north and south through rare, long-distance dispersal. Our findings show that this dispersal is important for new colony foundation and range expansion in a seabird species that ordinarily exhibits high levels of natal philopatry, but persistent oceanographic features serve as barriers to movement.
DRYAD
Levy, Hila
706757f3-1c20-448d-ae44-685fb805ce82
Clucas, Gemma V.
01c99eb2-5dbb-4f55-847c-1283065b40e1
Rogers, Alex D.
fb474198-f059-48f7-b637-74617b5023f6
Leaché, Adam D.
e208bb4f-aa45-4ccb-a6b7-3f6f464b32b1
Ciborowski, Kate L.
7a3a2207-67b6-469b-b399-84eed35bac4e
Polito, Michael J.
0ca8084c-6c7c-4d3e-afbc-4240d1f5cab8
Lynch, Heather J.
045997dc-e132-4d97-a2af-b715ad5a68b7
Dunn, Michael J.
0bcb6aec-1d9c-4891-b07b-0358628237a9
Hart, Tom
de3eadf1-5833-4bdd-ba26-c608ed0eb206
Levy, Hila
706757f3-1c20-448d-ae44-685fb805ce82
Clucas, Gemma V.
01c99eb2-5dbb-4f55-847c-1283065b40e1
Rogers, Alex D.
fb474198-f059-48f7-b637-74617b5023f6
Leaché, Adam D.
e208bb4f-aa45-4ccb-a6b7-3f6f464b32b1
Ciborowski, Kate L.
7a3a2207-67b6-469b-b399-84eed35bac4e
Polito, Michael J.
0ca8084c-6c7c-4d3e-afbc-4240d1f5cab8
Lynch, Heather J.
045997dc-e132-4d97-a2af-b715ad5a68b7
Dunn, Michael J.
0bcb6aec-1d9c-4891-b07b-0358628237a9
Hart, Tom
de3eadf1-5833-4bdd-ba26-c608ed0eb206

Levy, Hila, Rogers, Alex D., Leaché, Adam D., Ciborowski, Kate L., Polito, Michael J., Lynch, Heather J., Dunn, Michael J. and Hart, Tom (2017) Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc. DRYAD doi:10.5061/dryad.84c78 [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Climate change, fisheries pressure on penguin prey, and direct human disturbance of wildlife have all been implicated in causing large shifts in the abundance and distribution of penguins in the Southern Ocean. Without mark-recapture studies, understanding how colonies form and, by extension, how ranges shift is challenging. Genetic studies, particularly focused on newly established colonies, provide a snapshot of colonisation and can reveal the extent to which shifts in abundance and occupancy result from changes in demographic rates (e.g., reproduction and survival) or migration among suitable patches of habitat. Here we describe the population structure of a colonial seabird breeding across a large latitudinal range in the Southern Ocean. Using multilocus microsatellite genotype data from 510 Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) individuals from 14 colonies along the Scotia Arc and Antarctic Peninsula, together with mitochondrial DNA data, we find strong genetic differentiation between colonies north and south of the Polar Front, that coincides geographically with the taxonomic boundary separating the subspecies P. p. papua and P. p. ellsworthii. Using a discrete Bayesian phylogeographic approach, we show that southern Gentoos expanded from a possible glacial refuge in the centre of their current range, colonising regions to the north and south through rare, long-distance dispersal. Our findings show that this dispersal is important for new colony foundation and range expansion in a seabird species that ordinarily exhibits high levels of natal philopatry, but persistent oceanographic features serve as barriers to movement.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 449135
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/449135
PURE UUID: d57ae905-c81a-4846-9fd9-171496f0b7e4
ORCID for Gemma V. Clucas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4305-1719

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2021 16:34
Last modified: 15 Dec 2021 02:22

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Contributors

Creator: Hila Levy
Contributor: Gemma V. Clucas ORCID iD
Creator: Alex D. Rogers
Creator: Adam D. Leaché
Creator: Kate L. Ciborowski
Creator: Michael J. Polito
Creator: Heather J. Lynch
Creator: Michael J. Dunn
Creator: Tom Hart

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