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Cold water ingestion improves exercise tolerance of heat-sensitive people with MS.

Cold water ingestion improves exercise tolerance of heat-sensitive people with MS.
Cold water ingestion improves exercise tolerance of heat-sensitive people with MS.
Purpose
Heat intolerance commonly affects the exercise capacity of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) during bouts of hot weather. Cold water ingestion is a simple cooling strategy, but its efficacy for prolonging exercise capacity with MS remains undetermined. We sought to identify whether cold water ingestion blunts exercise-induced rises in body temperature and improves exercise tolerance in heat-sensitive individuals with MS.

Methods
On two separate occasions, 20 participants (10 relapsing–remitting MS (expanded disability status scale, 2–4.5); 10 age-matched healthy controls) cycled at ∼40% V˙O2max at 30°C and 30% relative humidity until volitional exhaustion (or a maximum of 60 min). Every 15 min, participants ingested 3.2 mL·kg−1 of either 1.5°C (CLD) or 37°C (NEU) water. Rectal (Tre) temperature, mean skin (Tsk) temperature, and heart rate (HR) were measured throughout.

Results
All 10 controls but only 3 of 10 MS participants completed 60 min of exercise in NEU trial. The remaining 7 MS participants all cycled longer (P = 0.006) in CLD (46.4 ± 14.2 min) compared with NEU (32.7 ± 11.5 min), despite a similar absolute Tre (NEU: 37.32°C ± 0.34°C; CLD: 37.28°C ± 0.26°C; P = 0.44), change in Tre (NEU: 0.38°C ± 0.21°C; CLD: 0.34°C ± 0.24°C), absolute Tsk (NEU: 34.48°C ± 0.47°C; CLD: 34.44°C ± 0.54°C; P = 0.82), and HR (NEU: 114 ± 20 bpm; CLD: 113 ± 18 bpm; P = 0.38) for the same exercise volume.

Conclusions
Cold water ingestion enhanced exercise tolerance of MS participants in the heat by ∼30% despite no differences in Tre, Tsk or HR. These findings support the use of a simple cooling strategy for mitigating heat intolerance with MS and lend insight into the potential role of cold-afferent thermoreceptors that reside in the abdomen and oral cavity in the modulation of exercise tolerance with MS in the heat.
0195-9131
643-648
Chaseling, G.K.
34771262-b371-4d37-b631-e60d5e65d752
Filingeri, D.
42502a34-e7e6-4b49-b304-ce2ae0bf7b24
Barnett, M.
fc382e7c-545c-42af-b5b2-65656518109d
Hoang, P.
c8f2be93-8eb7-456d-b70e-50c1dd796e76
Davis, S.L.
59eccbaf-0d14-455d-9554-9ec00b6ee4cd
Jay, O.
2e255cfd-1fc6-4ce7-891d-4fcba88c0250
Chaseling, G.K.
34771262-b371-4d37-b631-e60d5e65d752
Filingeri, D.
42502a34-e7e6-4b49-b304-ce2ae0bf7b24
Barnett, M.
fc382e7c-545c-42af-b5b2-65656518109d
Hoang, P.
c8f2be93-8eb7-456d-b70e-50c1dd796e76
Davis, S.L.
59eccbaf-0d14-455d-9554-9ec00b6ee4cd
Jay, O.
2e255cfd-1fc6-4ce7-891d-4fcba88c0250

Chaseling, G.K., Filingeri, D., Barnett, M., Hoang, P., Davis, S.L. and Jay, O. (2018) Cold water ingestion improves exercise tolerance of heat-sensitive people with MS. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 50 (4), 643-648. (doi:10.1249/mss.0000000000001496).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose
Heat intolerance commonly affects the exercise capacity of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) during bouts of hot weather. Cold water ingestion is a simple cooling strategy, but its efficacy for prolonging exercise capacity with MS remains undetermined. We sought to identify whether cold water ingestion blunts exercise-induced rises in body temperature and improves exercise tolerance in heat-sensitive individuals with MS.

Methods
On two separate occasions, 20 participants (10 relapsing–remitting MS (expanded disability status scale, 2–4.5); 10 age-matched healthy controls) cycled at ∼40% V˙O2max at 30°C and 30% relative humidity until volitional exhaustion (or a maximum of 60 min). Every 15 min, participants ingested 3.2 mL·kg−1 of either 1.5°C (CLD) or 37°C (NEU) water. Rectal (Tre) temperature, mean skin (Tsk) temperature, and heart rate (HR) were measured throughout.

Results
All 10 controls but only 3 of 10 MS participants completed 60 min of exercise in NEU trial. The remaining 7 MS participants all cycled longer (P = 0.006) in CLD (46.4 ± 14.2 min) compared with NEU (32.7 ± 11.5 min), despite a similar absolute Tre (NEU: 37.32°C ± 0.34°C; CLD: 37.28°C ± 0.26°C; P = 0.44), change in Tre (NEU: 0.38°C ± 0.21°C; CLD: 0.34°C ± 0.24°C), absolute Tsk (NEU: 34.48°C ± 0.47°C; CLD: 34.44°C ± 0.54°C; P = 0.82), and HR (NEU: 114 ± 20 bpm; CLD: 113 ± 18 bpm; P = 0.38) for the same exercise volume.

Conclusions
Cold water ingestion enhanced exercise tolerance of MS participants in the heat by ∼30% despite no differences in Tre, Tsk or HR. These findings support the use of a simple cooling strategy for mitigating heat intolerance with MS and lend insight into the potential role of cold-afferent thermoreceptors that reside in the abdomen and oral cavity in the modulation of exercise tolerance with MS in the heat.

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More information

Published date: 1 April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 449139
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/449139
ISSN: 0195-9131
PURE UUID: a0bf5bdc-6a55-4cf7-b73e-d66082faa1ef
ORCID for D. Filingeri: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5652-395X
ORCID for M. Barnett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3882-3649

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 May 2021 16:30
Last modified: 17 Jul 2021 02:09

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Contributors

Author: G.K. Chaseling
Author: D. Filingeri ORCID iD
Author: M. Barnett ORCID iD
Author: P. Hoang
Author: S.L. Davis
Author: O. Jay

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