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Why do people use different forms of complementary medicine? Multivariate associations between treatment and illness beliefs and complementary medicine use.

Why do people use different forms of complementary medicine? Multivariate associations between treatment and illness beliefs and complementary medicine use.
Why do people use different forms of complementary medicine? Multivariate associations between treatment and illness beliefs and complementary medicine use.
This study investigated associations between complementary medicine use and treatment and illness beliefs. Previously validated questionnaire measures of treatment beliefs, illness beliefs, and complementary medicine use were presented and advertised online. Completed questionnaires were received from 247 participants. Logistic regression analysis showed that demographic characteristics, treatment beliefs, and illness beliefs accounted for approximately 36% of the variance in complementary medicine use. Separate analyses were conducted to predict use of different types of complementary medicine. The strength of associations between beliefs and complementary medicine use was related to the type of complementary medicine used. The results suggest that people use complementary medicine because they are attracted to it rather than because they are disillusioned with orthodox medicine, and that both treatment and illness beliefs have an important role in explaining why people use complementary medicine
complementary medicine, cam, treatment beliefs, illness beliefs, questionnaire
0887-0446
683-698
Bishop, F.L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Yardley, L.
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Lewith, G.T.
0fc483fa-f17b-47c5-94d9-5c15e65a7625
Bishop, F.L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Yardley, L.
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Lewith, G.T.
0fc483fa-f17b-47c5-94d9-5c15e65a7625

Bishop, F.L., Yardley, L. and Lewith, G.T. (2006) Why do people use different forms of complementary medicine? Multivariate associations between treatment and illness beliefs and complementary medicine use. Psychology and Health, 21 (5), 683-698. (doi:10.1080/14768320500444216).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study investigated associations between complementary medicine use and treatment and illness beliefs. Previously validated questionnaire measures of treatment beliefs, illness beliefs, and complementary medicine use were presented and advertised online. Completed questionnaires were received from 247 participants. Logistic regression analysis showed that demographic characteristics, treatment beliefs, and illness beliefs accounted for approximately 36% of the variance in complementary medicine use. Separate analyses were conducted to predict use of different types of complementary medicine. The strength of associations between beliefs and complementary medicine use was related to the type of complementary medicine used. The results suggest that people use complementary medicine because they are attracted to it rather than because they are disillusioned with orthodox medicine, and that both treatment and illness beliefs have an important role in explaining why people use complementary medicine

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Published date: 2006
Keywords: complementary medicine, cam, treatment beliefs, illness beliefs, questionnaire

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44924
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44924
ISSN: 0887-0446
PURE UUID: 1071e23b-220b-4f39-8679-40ab16ff9c4b
ORCID for F.L. Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662

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Date deposited: 21 Mar 2007
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:44

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Contributors

Author: F.L. Bishop ORCID iD
Author: L. Yardley
Author: G.T. Lewith

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