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Social perception of risk-proneness as a function of expressions of emotions: emotions and perceived risk taking

Social perception of risk-proneness as a function of expressions of emotions: emotions and perceived risk taking
Social perception of risk-proneness as a function of expressions of emotions: emotions and perceived risk taking
Two studies showed that emotion expressions serve as cues to the expresser’s willingness to take risks in general, as well as in five risk domains (ethical, financial, health and safety, recreational, and social). Emotion expressions did not have a uniform effect on risk estimates across risk domains. Rather, these effects fit behavioral intentions associated with each emotion. Thus, anger expressions were related to ethical and social risks. Sadness reduced perceived willingness to take financial (Study 1 only), recreational, and social risks. Happiness reduced perceived willingness to take ethical and health/safety risks relative to neutrality. Disgust expressions increased the perceived likelihood of taking a social risk. Finally, neutrality increased the perceived willingness to engage in risky behavior in general. Overall, these results suggest that observers use their naïve understanding of the meaning of emotions to infer how likely an expresser is to engage in risky behavior.
1664-1078
Hareli, Shlomo
2db82e8f-a393-48ec-b00d-b464112ddbfb
Elkabetz, Shimon
1137fac0-a9ca-440e-abbd-04ed06e3bbb4
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
hess, Ursula
71759303-6fed-436e-b938-daf53fd48c6e
Hareli, Shlomo
2db82e8f-a393-48ec-b00d-b464112ddbfb
Elkabetz, Shimon
1137fac0-a9ca-440e-abbd-04ed06e3bbb4
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
hess, Ursula
71759303-6fed-436e-b938-daf53fd48c6e

Hareli, Shlomo, Elkabetz, Shimon, Hanoch, Yaniv and hess, Ursula (2021) Social perception of risk-proneness as a function of expressions of emotions: emotions and perceived risk taking. Frontiers in Psychology. (doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2021.655314).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two studies showed that emotion expressions serve as cues to the expresser’s willingness to take risks in general, as well as in five risk domains (ethical, financial, health and safety, recreational, and social). Emotion expressions did not have a uniform effect on risk estimates across risk domains. Rather, these effects fit behavioral intentions associated with each emotion. Thus, anger expressions were related to ethical and social risks. Sadness reduced perceived willingness to take financial (Study 1 only), recreational, and social risks. Happiness reduced perceived willingness to take ethical and health/safety risks relative to neutrality. Disgust expressions increased the perceived likelihood of taking a social risk. Finally, neutrality increased the perceived willingness to engage in risky behavior in general. Overall, these results suggest that observers use their naïve understanding of the meaning of emotions to infer how likely an expresser is to engage in risky behavior.

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 April 2021
Published date: 1 June 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 449586
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/449586
ISSN: 1664-1078
PURE UUID: 570807ae-300f-4f5a-b7fe-736aa0b0a558
ORCID for Yaniv Hanoch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9453-4588

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Date deposited: 08 Jun 2021 16:32
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 03:34

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Contributors

Author: Shlomo Hareli
Author: Shimon Elkabetz
Author: Yaniv Hanoch ORCID iD
Author: Ursula hess

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