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Otitis Media prior to Cochlear Implantation; an evaluation of history taking across the life-course

Otitis Media prior to Cochlear Implantation; an evaluation of history taking across the life-course
Otitis Media prior to Cochlear Implantation; an evaluation of history taking across the life-course
Background and Aims:
Otitis Media and middle-ear inflammation is associated with increased cochlear implant complications and may reduce recipients’ quality of hearing. It is not known how thoroughly historic otitis media is recorded. This study aims to investigate how thoroughly middle ear inflammatory histories are documented in cochlear implant recipients from a tertiary Auditory Implant Service prior to surgery.
Methods:
Clinical records of cochlear implant recipients were examined to observe how any history of otitis media was documented, ERGO 62161. Multiple criteria for assessing middle ear health were utilised including tympanometry performance, otoscopy and CT scan reports, otological surgery (e.g. grommet insertion) and mention of ear infections. Data was extracted and analysed using descriptive statistics.
Results:
This study demonstrates the documentation practice of recording middle ear inflammatory histories within a tertiary UK centre. The data highlights differences in practice between paediatric and adult cochlear implant users, with increased documentation amongst paediatric recipients. This suggests that there may be under recording of early life middle ear inflammation particularly amongst adult individuals who undergo cochlear implantation later life.
Discussion/Importance of Findings:
The factors affecting cochlear implant performance are poorly understood. We suggest early life inflammation from otitis media may modulate cochlear implant hearing outcomes, through mechanisms of ‘immunological memory’ including macrophage priming. This study, by demonstrating the documenting practice, provides foundations for further research into the relationship between prior middle ear inflammation and cochlear implant performances.
Edwards, Matthew
ffdd47a6-e4ed-4d1c-9d4b-7f5eea5b796d
Hough, Kate
4ab6ce34-81be-4bff-bdc1-bdd22bbb0ace
Grasmeder, Mary
206e6b44-d1cd-43f5-99ac-588ab02d44ef
Verschuur, Carl
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41
Newman, Tracey
322290cb-2e9c-445d-a047-00b1bea39a25
Edwards, Matthew
ffdd47a6-e4ed-4d1c-9d4b-7f5eea5b796d
Hough, Kate
4ab6ce34-81be-4bff-bdc1-bdd22bbb0ace
Grasmeder, Mary
206e6b44-d1cd-43f5-99ac-588ab02d44ef
Verschuur, Carl
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41
Newman, Tracey
322290cb-2e9c-445d-a047-00b1bea39a25

Edwards, Matthew, Hough, Kate, Grasmeder, Mary, Verschuur, Carl and Newman, Tracey (2021) Otitis Media prior to Cochlear Implantation; an evaluation of history taking across the life-course. 21st International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media, Virtual - Brighton and Sussex Medical School, United Kingdom. 11 - 12 Jun 2021.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Background and Aims:
Otitis Media and middle-ear inflammation is associated with increased cochlear implant complications and may reduce recipients’ quality of hearing. It is not known how thoroughly historic otitis media is recorded. This study aims to investigate how thoroughly middle ear inflammatory histories are documented in cochlear implant recipients from a tertiary Auditory Implant Service prior to surgery.
Methods:
Clinical records of cochlear implant recipients were examined to observe how any history of otitis media was documented, ERGO 62161. Multiple criteria for assessing middle ear health were utilised including tympanometry performance, otoscopy and CT scan reports, otological surgery (e.g. grommet insertion) and mention of ear infections. Data was extracted and analysed using descriptive statistics.
Results:
This study demonstrates the documentation practice of recording middle ear inflammatory histories within a tertiary UK centre. The data highlights differences in practice between paediatric and adult cochlear implant users, with increased documentation amongst paediatric recipients. This suggests that there may be under recording of early life middle ear inflammation particularly amongst adult individuals who undergo cochlear implantation later life.
Discussion/Importance of Findings:
The factors affecting cochlear implant performance are poorly understood. We suggest early life inflammation from otitis media may modulate cochlear implant hearing outcomes, through mechanisms of ‘immunological memory’ including macrophage priming. This study, by demonstrating the documenting practice, provides foundations for further research into the relationship between prior middle ear inflammation and cochlear implant performances.

Text
Cochlear Implantation and Historic Otitis Media
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More information

Published date: 11 June 2021
Venue - Dates: 21st International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media, Virtual - Brighton and Sussex Medical School, United Kingdom, 2021-06-11 - 2021-06-12

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 449865
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/449865
PURE UUID: 4b71ba7d-2f8d-49a6-87fe-4f627ac72278
ORCID for Kate Hough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5160-2517
ORCID for Tracey Newman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3727-9258

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jun 2021 16:30
Last modified: 24 Jun 2021 01:52

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Contributors

Author: Matthew Edwards
Author: Kate Hough ORCID iD
Author: Mary Grasmeder
Author: Carl Verschuur
Author: Tracey Newman ORCID iD

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