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Applying a circular economy approach to valorize spent coffee grounds

Applying a circular economy approach to valorize spent coffee grounds
Applying a circular economy approach to valorize spent coffee grounds
The Coffee industry faces a range of sustainability issues including energy demand, waste management and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study develops and analyses an experimental WTE proposal using an independent Coffee Company’s integrated energy-waste management strategy, to achieve a circular economy (CE) system: treatment and reuse of spent coffee grounds (SCG) to fuel the roasting-phase. The SCG’s chemical properties and combustion characteristics were determined using international standard methods and evaluated against conventional fuels to establish their energetic-potential; this included elemental composition, thermochemical behaviour, higher heating value (HHV) and carbon dioxide emissions (CO2e). A Life Cycle Analysis approach was utilised to calculate the CO2 emissions for each fuel sample and roasting scenario, demonstrative of the roasting-phase and representative of Scope 1 emissions. The SCG were more energetic than conventional-biomass, however, less than fossil fuels. SCG utilisation achieved carbon savings of 5.06 kg CO2e / kg-1 fuel for each batch roasted compared to a conventional approach, and a further 0.77kg CO2e / kg-1fuel for each batch roasted resulting from integrated subsystems (total 5.83 kg CO2e / kg-1 fuel). SCG high nitrogen concentration may still cause concerns about GHG emissions. The integrated energy-waste management strategy facilitates industrial symbiosis, clearly achieving waste reduction by exercising CE characteristics, namely ‘resource-sharing’ and ‘increased cooperation’ between coffee roasteries and shops, enabled by zero-waste principles and Coffee Company’s reverse-logistic Product Service Model. Recovering value from SCG as part of the coffee supply chain shows significant promise towards achieving a CE system, indicated by reduced raw material extraction, waste generation and CO2 emissions.
Circular Economy, Greenhouse gas, Waste management, Waste to energy, spent coffee grounds
0921-3449
Mayson, Sarah
74f2da59-9044-46d9-ab93-c1fb14623d2e
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Mayson, Sarah
74f2da59-9044-46d9-ab93-c1fb14623d2e
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Mayson, Sarah and Williams, Ian (2021) Applying a circular economy approach to valorize spent coffee grounds. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 172, [105659]. (doi:10.1016/j.resconrec.2021.105659).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Coffee industry faces a range of sustainability issues including energy demand, waste management and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study develops and analyses an experimental WTE proposal using an independent Coffee Company’s integrated energy-waste management strategy, to achieve a circular economy (CE) system: treatment and reuse of spent coffee grounds (SCG) to fuel the roasting-phase. The SCG’s chemical properties and combustion characteristics were determined using international standard methods and evaluated against conventional fuels to establish their energetic-potential; this included elemental composition, thermochemical behaviour, higher heating value (HHV) and carbon dioxide emissions (CO2e). A Life Cycle Analysis approach was utilised to calculate the CO2 emissions for each fuel sample and roasting scenario, demonstrative of the roasting-phase and representative of Scope 1 emissions. The SCG were more energetic than conventional-biomass, however, less than fossil fuels. SCG utilisation achieved carbon savings of 5.06 kg CO2e / kg-1 fuel for each batch roasted compared to a conventional approach, and a further 0.77kg CO2e / kg-1fuel for each batch roasted resulting from integrated subsystems (total 5.83 kg CO2e / kg-1 fuel). SCG high nitrogen concentration may still cause concerns about GHG emissions. The integrated energy-waste management strategy facilitates industrial symbiosis, clearly achieving waste reduction by exercising CE characteristics, namely ‘resource-sharing’ and ‘increased cooperation’ between coffee roasteries and shops, enabled by zero-waste principles and Coffee Company’s reverse-logistic Product Service Model. Recovering value from SCG as part of the coffee supply chain shows significant promise towards achieving a CE system, indicated by reduced raw material extraction, waste generation and CO2 emissions.

Text
Mayson&WilliamsResubmission2-clean - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 April 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 May 2021
Published date: 1 September 2021
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: Circular Economy, Greenhouse gas, Waste management, Waste to energy, spent coffee grounds

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450066
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450066
ISSN: 0921-3449
PURE UUID: c9c5529e-f021-448e-9cc2-93b0886e2cc4
ORCID for Ian Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jul 2021 16:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:49

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Contributors

Author: Sarah Mayson
Author: Ian Williams ORCID iD

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