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Genomics-informed models reveal extensive stretches of coastline under threat by an ecologically dominant invasive species

Genomics-informed models reveal extensive stretches of coastline under threat by an ecologically dominant invasive species
Genomics-informed models reveal extensive stretches of coastline under threat by an ecologically dominant invasive species
Explaining why some species are widespread, while others are not, is fundamental to biogeography, ecology, and evolutionary biology. A unique way to study evolutionary and ecological mech- anisms that either limit species’ spread or facilitate range expansions is to conduct research on species that have restricted distributions. Nonindigenous species, particularly those that are highly invasive but have not yet spread beyond the introduced site, represent ideal systems to study range size changes. Here, we used species distribu- tion modeling and genomic data to study the restricted range of a highly invasive Australian marine species, the ascidian Pyura praepu- tialis. This species is an aggressive space occupier in its introduced range (Chile), where it has fundamentally altered the coastal com- munity. We found high genomic diversity in Chile, indicating high adaptive potential. In addition, genomic data clearly showed that a single region from Australia was the only donor of genotypes to the introduced range. We identified over 3,500 km of suitable habitat adjacent to its current introduced range that has so far not been occupied, and importantly species distribution models were only ac- curate when genomic data were considered. Our results suggest that a slight change in currents, or a change in shipping routes, may lead to an expansion of the species’ introduced range that will encompass a vast portion of the South American coast. Our study shows how the use of population genomics and species distribution modeling in combination can unravel mechanisms shaping range sizes and fore- cast future range shifts of invasive species
Climate change, Intertidal, Invasion biology, Population genomics, Range expansion
0027-8424
Hudson, James
13270335-45dc-4760-aec9-38270359389a
Haigh, Ivan
945ff20a-589c-47b7-b06f-61804367eb2d
Rius, Marc
c4e88345-4b4e-4428-b4b2-37229155f68d
Hudson, James
13270335-45dc-4760-aec9-38270359389a
Haigh, Ivan
945ff20a-589c-47b7-b06f-61804367eb2d
Rius, Marc
c4e88345-4b4e-4428-b4b2-37229155f68d

Hudson, James, Haigh, Ivan and Rius, Marc (2021) Genomics-informed models reveal extensive stretches of coastline under threat by an ecologically dominant invasive species. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118 (23), [e2022169118]. (doi:10.1073/pnas.2022169118).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Explaining why some species are widespread, while others are not, is fundamental to biogeography, ecology, and evolutionary biology. A unique way to study evolutionary and ecological mech- anisms that either limit species’ spread or facilitate range expansions is to conduct research on species that have restricted distributions. Nonindigenous species, particularly those that are highly invasive but have not yet spread beyond the introduced site, represent ideal systems to study range size changes. Here, we used species distribu- tion modeling and genomic data to study the restricted range of a highly invasive Australian marine species, the ascidian Pyura praepu- tialis. This species is an aggressive space occupier in its introduced range (Chile), where it has fundamentally altered the coastal com- munity. We found high genomic diversity in Chile, indicating high adaptive potential. In addition, genomic data clearly showed that a single region from Australia was the only donor of genotypes to the introduced range. We identified over 3,500 km of suitable habitat adjacent to its current introduced range that has so far not been occupied, and importantly species distribution models were only ac- curate when genomic data were considered. Our results suggest that a slight change in currents, or a change in shipping routes, may lead to an expansion of the species’ introduced range that will encompass a vast portion of the South American coast. Our study shows how the use of population genomics and species distribution modeling in combination can unravel mechanisms shaping range sizes and fore- cast future range shifts of invasive species

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e-pub ahead of print date: 8 June 2021
Keywords: Climate change, Intertidal, Invasion biology, Population genomics, Range expansion

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450296
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450296
ISSN: 0027-8424
PURE UUID: eed7dbb6-fadb-4f1e-af71-7d8ef0aa48d9

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Date deposited: 21 Jul 2021 16:30
Last modified: 14 Sep 2021 20:16

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