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Evaluation of a child food reward task and its association with maternal feeding practices

Evaluation of a child food reward task and its association with maternal feeding practices
Evaluation of a child food reward task and its association with maternal feeding practices
Food reward is defined as the momentary value of a food to the individual at the time of ingestion and is characterised by two psychological processes–“liking” and “wanting”. We aimed to validate an age-appropriate food reward task to quantify implicit wanting of children from the GUSTO cohort (n = 430). At age 5 years, child appetitive traits and maternal feeding practices were reported by mothers via questionnaires. At age 6, a write-for-food task based on the child’s preference for food or toy rewards was undertaken in laboratory conditions. Child BMI and skinfold measurements were taken at age 7. Convergent validity of the food reward task was assessed by associating with child appetitive traits, where enjoyment of food/food responsiveness (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.15) and emotional overeating (OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.48) were positively associated with high food reward in children. Criterion validity was tested by associating with child BMI, however no significant relationships were observed. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with maternal feeding practices revealed that children whose mother tend to restrict unhealthy food (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.82) and girls whose mothers taught them about nutrition (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.19, 3.67) were more likely to have high food reward. No further significant associations were observed between food reward, other appetitive traits and feeding practices. Despite the lack of association with child weight status, this study demonstrated the value of the write-for-food task to assess food reward in children and presented sex-specific associations with maternal feeding practices.
1932-6203
Toh, Jia Ying
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Quah, Phaik Ling
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Wong, Chun Hong
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Yuan, Wen Lun
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Aris, Izzuddin M.
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McCrickerd, Keri
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Godfrey, Keith
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Shek, Lynette P.
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Yap, Fabian
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Meaney, Michael J.
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Forde, Ciaran G
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Broekman, Birit F.P.
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Chong, Mary F.F.
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Toh, Jia Ying
9422c0a5-097c-4ecc-b103-0411f16efafb
Quah, Phaik Ling
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Wong, Chun Hong
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Yuan, Wen Lun
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Aris, Izzuddin M.
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McCrickerd, Keri
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Godfrey, Keith
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Shek, Lynette P.
9a77403c-0e0c-4536-a5ad-628ce94b279a
Tan, Kok Hian
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Yap, Fabian
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Meaney, Michael J.
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Forde, Ciaran G
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Broekman, Birit F.P.
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Chong, Mary F.F.
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Toh, Jia Ying, Quah, Phaik Ling, Wong, Chun Hong, Yuan, Wen Lun, Aris, Izzuddin M., McCrickerd, Keri, Godfrey, Keith, Chong, Yap-Seng, Shek, Lynette P., Tan, Kok Hian, Yap, Fabian, Meaney, Michael J., Forde, Ciaran G, Lee, Yung Seng, Broekman, Birit F.P. and Chong, Mary F.F. (2021) Evaluation of a child food reward task and its association with maternal feeding practices. PLoS ONE, 16 (July), [e0254773]. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0254773).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Food reward is defined as the momentary value of a food to the individual at the time of ingestion and is characterised by two psychological processes–“liking” and “wanting”. We aimed to validate an age-appropriate food reward task to quantify implicit wanting of children from the GUSTO cohort (n = 430). At age 5 years, child appetitive traits and maternal feeding practices were reported by mothers via questionnaires. At age 6, a write-for-food task based on the child’s preference for food or toy rewards was undertaken in laboratory conditions. Child BMI and skinfold measurements were taken at age 7. Convergent validity of the food reward task was assessed by associating with child appetitive traits, where enjoyment of food/food responsiveness (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.15) and emotional overeating (OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.48) were positively associated with high food reward in children. Criterion validity was tested by associating with child BMI, however no significant relationships were observed. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with maternal feeding practices revealed that children whose mother tend to restrict unhealthy food (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.82) and girls whose mothers taught them about nutrition (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.19, 3.67) were more likely to have high food reward. No further significant associations were observed between food reward, other appetitive traits and feeding practices. Despite the lack of association with child weight status, this study demonstrated the value of the write-for-food task to assess food reward in children and presented sex-specific associations with maternal feeding practices.

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Accepted/In Press date: 5 July 2021
Published date: 21 July 2021
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Toh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450348
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450348
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 32a64893-e528-4cc5-aa93-10c3fdcd8491
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jul 2021 18:13
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:35

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Contributors

Author: Jia Ying Toh
Author: Phaik Ling Quah
Author: Chun Hong Wong
Author: Wen Lun Yuan
Author: Izzuddin M. Aris
Author: Keri McCrickerd
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Yap-Seng Chong
Author: Lynette P. Shek
Author: Kok Hian Tan
Author: Fabian Yap
Author: Michael J. Meaney
Author: Ciaran G Forde
Author: Yung Seng Lee
Author: Birit F.P. Broekman
Author: Mary F.F. Chong

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