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Enhanced crystallisation kinetics of edible lipids through the action of a bifurcated streamer

Enhanced crystallisation kinetics of edible lipids through the action of a bifurcated streamer
Enhanced crystallisation kinetics of edible lipids through the action of a bifurcated streamer
The processing of healthy foods remains a challenge and any technology with the ability to tailor the physical properties of new materials is in demand. High-intensity ultrasound (HIU) has been identified as a useful processing technique for such activities particularly for edible lipids. HIU has been known to alter the crystallisation kinetics and in turn the resultant physicochemical properties for specific food applications. The role of cavitation dynamics during treatment of oils with HIU is of interest, with the knowledge gained allowing for insight into the complex and still undefined mechanism of action. To this end, the crystallisation kinetics of an edible lipid were investigated in the presence of several distinctly different cavitation conditions. Several cavitation clusters, including a bifurcated streamer (BiS), located on the surface of a piston-like emitter (PLE) were studied, each generated by a specific ultrasonic power level. Only samples crystallised at a low supercooling (ΔTSC) value display significant differences in induction time for each of the selected HIU powers, at least 5 minutes earlier than without exposure to HIU. Substantially better energy efficiencies were seen for the BiS regime (ΔTSC = 5 °C) which coincided with maximal crystal growth rates. An increase in melting enthalpy and elastic modulus is reported in the presence of HIU for all crystallisation temperatures, this effect is larger overall with increasing ultrasonic power. In addition, sonicated samples in the presence of the BiS event were composed of fewer smaller crystals compared to higher HIU powers after 60 minutes at 30 °C. Bubble dynamics recorded during a 10 s sonication period exhibited a greater acoustic attenuation effect for the highest ultrasonic power (75 W). The results suggest that the dynamics of the cluster and the presence of the BiS event are important in terms of energy efficiency and the physical properties of the crystallised lipid material.
0003-2654
4883-4894
Youngs, Jack
bdc2f78f-ae97-4faf-8930-1970ca697867
Birkin, Peter R.
ba466560-f27c-418d-89fc-67ea4f81d0a7
Lee, Juhee
79f939d9-bb95-42a4-8c40-1247aff870d8
Truscott, Tadd
a7f0e66d-3c20-40ca-b795-bc9beec07132
Martini, Silvana
07d2edd4-c0d9-4703-aa4a-877c83ad7769
Youngs, Jack
bdc2f78f-ae97-4faf-8930-1970ca697867
Birkin, Peter R.
ba466560-f27c-418d-89fc-67ea4f81d0a7
Lee, Juhee
79f939d9-bb95-42a4-8c40-1247aff870d8
Truscott, Tadd
a7f0e66d-3c20-40ca-b795-bc9beec07132
Martini, Silvana
07d2edd4-c0d9-4703-aa4a-877c83ad7769

Youngs, Jack, Birkin, Peter R., Lee, Juhee, Truscott, Tadd and Martini, Silvana (2021) Enhanced crystallisation kinetics of edible lipids through the action of a bifurcated streamer. Analyst, 146 (15), 4883-4894. (doi:10.1039/D1AN00437A).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The processing of healthy foods remains a challenge and any technology with the ability to tailor the physical properties of new materials is in demand. High-intensity ultrasound (HIU) has been identified as a useful processing technique for such activities particularly for edible lipids. HIU has been known to alter the crystallisation kinetics and in turn the resultant physicochemical properties for specific food applications. The role of cavitation dynamics during treatment of oils with HIU is of interest, with the knowledge gained allowing for insight into the complex and still undefined mechanism of action. To this end, the crystallisation kinetics of an edible lipid were investigated in the presence of several distinctly different cavitation conditions. Several cavitation clusters, including a bifurcated streamer (BiS), located on the surface of a piston-like emitter (PLE) were studied, each generated by a specific ultrasonic power level. Only samples crystallised at a low supercooling (ΔTSC) value display significant differences in induction time for each of the selected HIU powers, at least 5 minutes earlier than without exposure to HIU. Substantially better energy efficiencies were seen for the BiS regime (ΔTSC = 5 °C) which coincided with maximal crystal growth rates. An increase in melting enthalpy and elastic modulus is reported in the presence of HIU for all crystallisation temperatures, this effect is larger overall with increasing ultrasonic power. In addition, sonicated samples in the presence of the BiS event were composed of fewer smaller crystals compared to higher HIU powers after 60 minutes at 30 °C. Bubble dynamics recorded during a 10 s sonication period exhibited a greater acoustic attenuation effect for the highest ultrasonic power (75 W). The results suggest that the dynamics of the cluster and the presence of the BiS event are important in terms of energy efficiency and the physical properties of the crystallised lipid material.

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Accepted/In Press date: 25 June 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 July 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450561
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450561
ISSN: 0003-2654
PURE UUID: 33d42db6-e81e-46b8-b469-f13f2625bb6d
ORCID for Peter R. Birkin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6656-4074

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Date deposited: 04 Aug 2021 16:30
Last modified: 26 Feb 2022 02:33

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Contributors

Author: Jack Youngs
Author: Peter R. Birkin ORCID iD
Author: Juhee Lee
Author: Tadd Truscott
Author: Silvana Martini

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