The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Environmental DNA metabarcoding and the study of marine biodiversity and biological invasions

Environmental DNA metabarcoding and the study of marine biodiversity and biological invasions
Environmental DNA metabarcoding and the study of marine biodiversity and biological invasions
Human activities negatively impact the biodiversity of oceanic and coastal ecosystems. Studies show that marine biodiversity is linked to ecosystem function and in turn to the ecosystem services upon which humans depend. A key driver of biodiversity loss is the introduction of non-native species which have a dramatic negative effect on biodiversity and carry a vast global economic cost. It is therefore critical to understand the causes of anthropogenic biodiversity loss, monitor the effect of management actions and, ultimately, document ecosystem recovery. The use of DNA isolated from environmental samples such as water or sediment(environmental DNA or eDNA) to infer the presence or absence of an organism is revolutionising our ability to monitor aquatic ecosystems. Yet, we have a limited understanding how eDNA can be deployed to answer fundamental and applied questions in marine biodiversity and invasion biology. This thesis begins by showing eDNA metabarcoding to be an accurate and sensitive tool for detection of marine non-native species and demonstrates how methodological choices affect the biodiversity that is detected. The utility of eDNA metabarcoding in broad-scale biogeographic analyses is then shown by identifyingt hat marine animals, protists and bacteria can have remarkably similar biogeographic patterns. The thesis then reveals the limitations of eDNA metabarcoding data in comparison to manual biodiversity surveys and mitochondrial DNA sequences isolated from tissue samples for several non-native species. Finally, it develops a method for non-invasively genotyping organisms using eDNA, showing that eDNA contains both mitochondrial and nuclear genetic biodiversity.
Overall, this thesis leverages the sensitivity, accuracy and taxonomic breadth of eDNA-based tools to answer key questions in invasion biology and marine biodiversity
University of Southampton
Holman, Luke, Earl
3d57aba8-c261-413b-a053-e7bed35adba0
Holman, Luke, Earl
3d57aba8-c261-413b-a053-e7bed35adba0
Rius Viladomiu, Marc
c4e88345-4b4e-4428-b4b2-37229155f68d

Holman, Luke, Earl (2021) Environmental DNA metabarcoding and the study of marine biodiversity and biological invasions. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 202pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Human activities negatively impact the biodiversity of oceanic and coastal ecosystems. Studies show that marine biodiversity is linked to ecosystem function and in turn to the ecosystem services upon which humans depend. A key driver of biodiversity loss is the introduction of non-native species which have a dramatic negative effect on biodiversity and carry a vast global economic cost. It is therefore critical to understand the causes of anthropogenic biodiversity loss, monitor the effect of management actions and, ultimately, document ecosystem recovery. The use of DNA isolated from environmental samples such as water or sediment(environmental DNA or eDNA) to infer the presence or absence of an organism is revolutionising our ability to monitor aquatic ecosystems. Yet, we have a limited understanding how eDNA can be deployed to answer fundamental and applied questions in marine biodiversity and invasion biology. This thesis begins by showing eDNA metabarcoding to be an accurate and sensitive tool for detection of marine non-native species and demonstrates how methodological choices affect the biodiversity that is detected. The utility of eDNA metabarcoding in broad-scale biogeographic analyses is then shown by identifyingt hat marine animals, protists and bacteria can have remarkably similar biogeographic patterns. The thesis then reveals the limitations of eDNA metabarcoding data in comparison to manual biodiversity surveys and mitochondrial DNA sequences isolated from tissue samples for several non-native species. Finally, it develops a method for non-invasively genotyping organisms using eDNA, showing that eDNA contains both mitochondrial and nuclear genetic biodiversity.
Overall, this thesis leverages the sensitivity, accuracy and taxonomic breadth of eDNA-based tools to answer key questions in invasion biology and marine biodiversity

Text
L.Holman.PhD.final_July2021 - Version of Record
Download (4kB)
Text
L.Holman_PermissionDepositThesisForm
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

More information

Published date: 29 July 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450590
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450590
PURE UUID: bb5a0648-4e40-4d62-97e9-6a88ae9c98a1
ORCID for Luke, Earl Holman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8139-3760

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Aug 2021 16:35
Last modified: 15 Oct 2021 04:01

Export record

Contributors

Author: Luke, Earl Holman ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Marc Rius Viladomiu

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×