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All coffee types decrease the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in chronic liver disease: a UK Biobank study

All coffee types decrease the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in chronic liver disease: a UK Biobank study
All coffee types decrease the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in chronic liver disease: a UK Biobank study
Background: chronic liver disease (CLD) is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly inlow to middle-income countries with high disease burden and limited treatment availability. Coffee consumptionhas been linked with lower rates of CLD, but little is known about the effects of different coffee types, which vary inchemical composition. This study aimed to investigate associations of coffee consumption, including decaffeinated,instant and ground coffee, with chronic liver disease outcomes.

Methods: a total of 494,585 UK Biobank participants with known coffee consumption and electronic linkage tohospital, death and cancer records were included in this study. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios(HR) of incident CLD, incident CLD or steatosis, incident hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death from CLDaccording to coffee consumption of any type as well as for decaffeinated, instant and ground coffee individually.

Results: among 384,818 coffee drinkers and 109,767 non-coffee drinkers, there were 3600 cases of CLD, 5439 casesof CLD or steatosis, 184 cases of HCC and 301 deaths from CLD during a median follow-up of 10.7 years. Comparedto non-coffee drinkers, coffee drinkers had lower adjusted HRs of CLD (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.72–0.86), CLD or steatosis(HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.75–0.86), death from CLD (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39–0.67) and HCC (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.54–1.19). The associations for decaffeinated, instant and ground coffee individually were similar to all types combined.

Conclusion: the finding that all types of coffee are protective against CLD is significant given the increasingincidence of CLD worldwide and the potential of coffee as an intervention to prevent CLD onset or progression
Chronic liver disease, Cirrhosis, Coffee, Hepatocellular carcinoma
1471-2458
Kennedy, Oliver J.
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Fallowfield, Jonathan A.
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Poole, Robin
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Hayes, Peter C.
d3516587-57c3-4a31-a041-9ca145d8bc71
Parkes, Julie
a3513cd3-3837-4304-8c94-51c8e15a1f5d
Roderick, Paul J.
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Kennedy, Oliver J.
96f5e8fc-f18e-4887-8504-77ffef83c7f1
Fallowfield, Jonathan A.
ba8f5afe-819a-4f8d-a7c5-3799c927c656
Poole, Robin
6c50b549-8b7b-47db-a7fc-b8762c6fce1c
Hayes, Peter C.
d3516587-57c3-4a31-a041-9ca145d8bc71
Parkes, Julie
a3513cd3-3837-4304-8c94-51c8e15a1f5d
Roderick, Paul J.
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a

Kennedy, Oliver J., Fallowfield, Jonathan A., Poole, Robin, Hayes, Peter C., Parkes, Julie and Roderick, Paul J. (2021) All coffee types decrease the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in chronic liver disease: a UK Biobank study. BMC Public Health, 21 (1), [970]. (doi:10.1186/s12889-021-10991-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: chronic liver disease (CLD) is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly inlow to middle-income countries with high disease burden and limited treatment availability. Coffee consumptionhas been linked with lower rates of CLD, but little is known about the effects of different coffee types, which vary inchemical composition. This study aimed to investigate associations of coffee consumption, including decaffeinated,instant and ground coffee, with chronic liver disease outcomes.

Methods: a total of 494,585 UK Biobank participants with known coffee consumption and electronic linkage tohospital, death and cancer records were included in this study. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios(HR) of incident CLD, incident CLD or steatosis, incident hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death from CLDaccording to coffee consumption of any type as well as for decaffeinated, instant and ground coffee individually.

Results: among 384,818 coffee drinkers and 109,767 non-coffee drinkers, there were 3600 cases of CLD, 5439 casesof CLD or steatosis, 184 cases of HCC and 301 deaths from CLD during a median follow-up of 10.7 years. Comparedto non-coffee drinkers, coffee drinkers had lower adjusted HRs of CLD (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.72–0.86), CLD or steatosis(HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.75–0.86), death from CLD (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39–0.67) and HCC (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.54–1.19). The associations for decaffeinated, instant and ground coffee individually were similar to all types combined.

Conclusion: the finding that all types of coffee are protective against CLD is significant given the increasingincidence of CLD worldwide and the potential of coffee as an intervention to prevent CLD onset or progression

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e-pub ahead of print date: 22 June 2021
Keywords: Chronic liver disease, Cirrhosis, Coffee, Hepatocellular carcinoma

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450635
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450635
ISSN: 1471-2458
PURE UUID: 8d5c630d-17c8-46e2-bc72-74c39ae084e8
ORCID for Paul J. Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850

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Date deposited: 05 Aug 2021 16:31
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 01:36

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Contributors

Author: Oliver J. Kennedy
Author: Jonathan A. Fallowfield
Author: Robin Poole
Author: Peter C. Hayes
Author: Julie Parkes

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