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A critical review of the definition of 'wellbeing' for doctors and their patients in a post Covid-19 era

A critical review of the definition of 'wellbeing' for doctors and their patients in a post Covid-19 era
A critical review of the definition of 'wellbeing' for doctors and their patients in a post Covid-19 era
Background:
There is no international consensus definition of ‘wellbeing’. This has led to wellbeing being captured in many different ways.

Aims:
To construct an inclusive, global operational definition of wellbeing.

Methods:
The differences between wellbeing components and determinants and the terms used interchangeably with wellbeing, such as health, are considered from the perspective of a doctor. The philosophies underpinning wellbeing and modern wellbeing research theories are discussed in terms of their appropriateness in an inclusive definition.

Results:
An operational definition is proposed that is not limited to doctors, but universal, and inclusive: ‘Wellbeing is a state of positive feelings and meeting full potential in the world. It can be measured subjectively and objectively, using a salutogenic approach’.

Conclusions:
This operational definition allows the differentiation of wellbeing from terms such as quality of life and emphasises that in the face of global challenges people should still consider wellbeing as more than the absence of pathology.
0020-7640
371
Simons, Gemma
fd1eb2bd-23d4-42a8-899b-5eeb5ad62b9c
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Simons, Gemma
fd1eb2bd-23d4-42a8-899b-5eeb5ad62b9c
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e

Simons, Gemma and Baldwin, David (2021) A critical review of the definition of 'wellbeing' for doctors and their patients in a post Covid-19 era. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 5 (5), 371. (doi:10.1177/1756283X10363751).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Background:
There is no international consensus definition of ‘wellbeing’. This has led to wellbeing being captured in many different ways.

Aims:
To construct an inclusive, global operational definition of wellbeing.

Methods:
The differences between wellbeing components and determinants and the terms used interchangeably with wellbeing, such as health, are considered from the perspective of a doctor. The philosophies underpinning wellbeing and modern wellbeing research theories are discussed in terms of their appropriateness in an inclusive definition.

Results:
An operational definition is proposed that is not limited to doctors, but universal, and inclusive: ‘Wellbeing is a state of positive feelings and meeting full potential in the world. It can be measured subjectively and objectively, using a salutogenic approach’.

Conclusions:
This operational definition allows the differentiation of wellbeing from terms such as quality of life and emphasises that in the face of global challenges people should still consider wellbeing as more than the absence of pathology.

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More information

Published date: 9 July 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 450877
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/450877
ISSN: 0020-7640
PURE UUID: 1af942a7-fac0-4901-9245-d87b9b24c9d3
ORCID for Gemma Simons: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2454-5948
ORCID for David Baldwin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3343-0907

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Aug 2021 16:32
Last modified: 18 Aug 2021 01:56

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Contributors

Author: Gemma Simons ORCID iD
Author: David Baldwin ORCID iD

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