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Foot and ankle pain and risk of incident knee osteoarthritis and knee pain: data from the multicentre osteoarthritis study

Foot and ankle pain and risk of incident knee osteoarthritis and knee pain: data from the multicentre osteoarthritis study
Foot and ankle pain and risk of incident knee osteoarthritis and knee pain: data from the multicentre osteoarthritis study
Objectives:
To examine whether foot and/or ankle pain increases the risk of knee OA.

Design:
We utilised longitudinal data from the Multicentre Osteoarthritis Study (MOST); a community-based cohort of risk factors for knee OA. Participants without frequent knee pain (clinic visit only) and radiographic knee OA (RKOA) at baseline and, with no evidence of musculoskeletal disease and a history of knee-related surgery were followed for up to 84-months for incident outcomes; i) RKOA (Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) ≥2), ii) symptomatic RKOA (RKOA and frequent pain in the same knee) and iii) frequent knee pain only. At baseline, ankle and foot symptoms were assessed, with knee radiographs and symptoms also assessed at 30, 60 and 84-months. Our exposures included baseline ankle, foot, and ankle and foot pain (participant-level). Associations between foot and/or ankle pain and incident outcomes were assessed using multiple logistic regression, with adjustment for participant characteristics and ankle/foot pain.

Results:
No statistically significant associations were observed between ankle, foot and, ankle and foot pain and incident RKOA, respectively. Ankle pain with (2.30, 95% CI 1.13 to 4.66) and without foot pain (OR: 2.53, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.80) were associated with increased odds of incident symptomatic RKOA and frequent knee pain. No statistically significant associations were observed between foot pain and these outcomes.

Conclusions:
Ankle pain should be a focus point, more so than foot pain, in the management of knee OA. Future studies should include additional ankle joint-specific symptom questions to better elucidate the knee OA biomechanical pathway.
2665-9131
Perry, Thomas A.
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Segal, Neil A.
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Bowen, Catherine
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Gates, Lucy
0cbba3d2-be6b-431a-a4bb-833da8322f16
Arden, Nigel
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Nevitt, Michael C.
5f0bdee4-7a9f-451c-944c-30f9d5ca0948
Perry, Thomas A.
c8585ab1-e82b-47b3-8961-ab98cbf8e952
Segal, Neil A.
9fa75d97-530b-418d-a6f9-d54d2031fe2f
Bowen, Catherine
fd85c3c5-96d9-49b8-86c6-caa94e1a222b
Gates, Lucy
0cbba3d2-be6b-431a-a4bb-833da8322f16
Arden, Nigel
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f
Nevitt, Michael C.
5f0bdee4-7a9f-451c-944c-30f9d5ca0948

Perry, Thomas A., Segal, Neil A., Bowen, Catherine, Gates, Lucy, Arden, Nigel and Nevitt, Michael C. (2021) Foot and ankle pain and risk of incident knee osteoarthritis and knee pain: data from the multicentre osteoarthritis study. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Open, [100210]. (doi:10.1016/j.ocarto.2021.100210).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives:
To examine whether foot and/or ankle pain increases the risk of knee OA.

Design:
We utilised longitudinal data from the Multicentre Osteoarthritis Study (MOST); a community-based cohort of risk factors for knee OA. Participants without frequent knee pain (clinic visit only) and radiographic knee OA (RKOA) at baseline and, with no evidence of musculoskeletal disease and a history of knee-related surgery were followed for up to 84-months for incident outcomes; i) RKOA (Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) ≥2), ii) symptomatic RKOA (RKOA and frequent pain in the same knee) and iii) frequent knee pain only. At baseline, ankle and foot symptoms were assessed, with knee radiographs and symptoms also assessed at 30, 60 and 84-months. Our exposures included baseline ankle, foot, and ankle and foot pain (participant-level). Associations between foot and/or ankle pain and incident outcomes were assessed using multiple logistic regression, with adjustment for participant characteristics and ankle/foot pain.

Results:
No statistically significant associations were observed between ankle, foot and, ankle and foot pain and incident RKOA, respectively. Ankle pain with (2.30, 95% CI 1.13 to 4.66) and without foot pain (OR: 2.53, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.80) were associated with increased odds of incident symptomatic RKOA and frequent knee pain. No statistically significant associations were observed between foot pain and these outcomes.

Conclusions:
Ankle pain should be a focus point, more so than foot pain, in the management of knee OA. Future studies should include additional ankle joint-specific symptom questions to better elucidate the knee OA biomechanical pathway.

Text
Foot and Ankle Pain and Risk of Incident Knee Osteoarthritis and Knee Pain - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 July 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 August 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 451135
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/451135
ISSN: 2665-9131
PURE UUID: a08e52b4-4c72-4864-9f89-5364f4888ffb
ORCID for Catherine Bowen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7252-9515

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Sep 2021 10:38
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 02:47

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Contributors

Author: Thomas A. Perry
Author: Neil A. Segal
Author: Catherine Bowen ORCID iD
Author: Lucy Gates
Author: Nigel Arden
Author: Michael C. Nevitt

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