The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Intuition, the Accimap, and the question “why?” Identifying and classifying higher-order factors contributing to road traffic collisions

Intuition, the Accimap, and the question “why?” Identifying and classifying higher-order factors contributing to road traffic collisions
Intuition, the Accimap, and the question “why?” Identifying and classifying higher-order factors contributing to road traffic collisions

Although the physical and environmental factors contributing to road traffic collisions are often the most straightforward to identify, they may not necessarily be the most useful in terms of guiding road safety intervention design. From a sociotechnical systems perspective, it is the higher system factors that, if addressed, would provide the widest-reaching benefits to system outcomes. That said, the identification of these higher-order factors often requires a level of intuition or imagination; they are not always objectively obvious given the facts of a particular case. Here, we argue for the use of the Accimap approach to accident (or collision) analysis, supplemented with a modified version of the five whys causal analysis technique, for the support and structuring of this intuiting process. We use an analysis of a fatal motorcycle collision to illustrate how coroners in the United Kingdom could be supported in their task of identifying and summarizing factors in accordance with the levels of the Accimap, and according to a categorization scheme indicating how abstract those factors are (i.e., immediate, proximal, or distal). Our analysis identified 21 immediate, 12 proximal, and 33 distal factors contributing to the collision. It is these distal factors that are most likely to lead to longer-term road safety improvements.

Accimap, collision database, contributory factors, sociotechnical system, traffic safety
1090-8471
546-558
McIlroy, Rich C.
68e56daa-5b0b-477e-a643-3c7b78c1b85d
Plant, Katherine L.
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
McIlroy, Rich C.
68e56daa-5b0b-477e-a643-3c7b78c1b85d
Plant, Katherine L.
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

McIlroy, Rich C., Plant, Katherine L. and Stanton, Neville A. (2021) Intuition, the Accimap, and the question “why?” Identifying and classifying higher-order factors contributing to road traffic collisions. Human Factors and Ergonomics In Manufacturing, 31 (5), 546-558. (doi:10.1002/hfm.20902).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although the physical and environmental factors contributing to road traffic collisions are often the most straightforward to identify, they may not necessarily be the most useful in terms of guiding road safety intervention design. From a sociotechnical systems perspective, it is the higher system factors that, if addressed, would provide the widest-reaching benefits to system outcomes. That said, the identification of these higher-order factors often requires a level of intuition or imagination; they are not always objectively obvious given the facts of a particular case. Here, we argue for the use of the Accimap approach to accident (or collision) analysis, supplemented with a modified version of the five whys causal analysis technique, for the support and structuring of this intuiting process. We use an analysis of a fatal motorcycle collision to illustrate how coroners in the United Kingdom could be supported in their task of identifying and summarizing factors in accordance with the levels of the Accimap, and according to a categorization scheme indicating how abstract those factors are (i.e., immediate, proximal, or distal). Our analysis identified 21 immediate, 12 proximal, and 33 distal factors contributing to the collision. It is these distal factors that are most likely to lead to longer-term road safety improvements.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 March 2021
Published date: 7 May 2021
Additional Information: Funding Information: This study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR; 16/137/122) using UK aid from the UK Government to support global health research. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the UK Department of Health and Social Care. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing & Service Industries published by Wiley Periodicals LLC Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: Accimap, collision database, contributory factors, sociotechnical system, traffic safety

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 451161
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/451161
ISSN: 1090-8471
PURE UUID: 5f5184c3-759b-4e3b-9ad9-ba32e1e60f03
ORCID for Rich C. McIlroy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0326-8101
ORCID for Katherine L. Plant: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4532-2818
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Sep 2021 15:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:11

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×