The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Towards in-flight temperature monitoring for nozzle guide vanes using ultrasonic guided waves: AIAA 2021-3475 Session: Gas Turbine Diagnostics, Prognostics and Controls

Towards in-flight temperature monitoring for nozzle guide vanes using ultrasonic guided waves: AIAA 2021-3475 Session: Gas Turbine Diagnostics, Prognostics and Controls
Towards in-flight temperature monitoring for nozzle guide vanes using ultrasonic guided waves: AIAA 2021-3475 Session: Gas Turbine Diagnostics, Prognostics and Controls
The temperature monitoring of nozzle guide vanes is a challenging task due to the extreme temperatures, gas pressures, and cramped conditions of aero-engines. Ultrasonic guided waves are an attractive method of temperature monitoring as the sensors can be placed outside of the gas path without influencing component operation. In this paper the suitability of using ultrasonic guided waves in the form of the S0 Lamb wave mode is investigated by comparing experimentally measured wave velocity change with temperature against theoretical wave velocity extracted from dispersion curves. Waves are transmitted through an aluminium plate using a pitch-catch wedge transducer configuration, and wave velocity is measured using across-correlation function. Temperature is controlled with a hot plate from room temperature to 100°C, and monitored using thermocouples. Results show that this transducer configuration is capable of monitoring a change in temperature based on a change in wave velocity, showing a good agreement with theoretical predictions, within 4.89+/-2.27 m/s on average. The temperature sensitivity of the system is 1.26–1.78 m/s/°C over the range 24°C–94°C. This shows the potential for a guided wave based temperature monitoring system, assuming a suitable transducer configuration can be found that is able to operate at higher temperatures. Further investigation will study the possibility of using Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors (PWAS) or waveguides for this application.
Lamb waves, Ultrasonic guided waves, Condition monitoring, Nozzle guide vanes
Yule, Lawrence
d95cece7-5fff-4bc6-bbf9-e276ab9425ac
Hill, Martyn
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Zaghari, Bahareh
81e02aa3-95b7-4b27-a303-45b000cf6115
Yule, Lawrence
d95cece7-5fff-4bc6-bbf9-e276ab9425ac
Hill, Martyn
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e
Harris, Nicholas
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Zaghari, Bahareh
81e02aa3-95b7-4b27-a303-45b000cf6115

Yule, Lawrence, Hill, Martyn, Harris, Nicholas and Zaghari, Bahareh (2021) Towards in-flight temperature monitoring for nozzle guide vanes using ultrasonic guided waves: AIAA 2021-3475 Session: Gas Turbine Diagnostics, Prognostics and Controls. AIAA Propulsion and Energy 2021 Forum, Virtual event. 09 - 11 Aug 2021. (doi:10.2514/6.2021-3475).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The temperature monitoring of nozzle guide vanes is a challenging task due to the extreme temperatures, gas pressures, and cramped conditions of aero-engines. Ultrasonic guided waves are an attractive method of temperature monitoring as the sensors can be placed outside of the gas path without influencing component operation. In this paper the suitability of using ultrasonic guided waves in the form of the S0 Lamb wave mode is investigated by comparing experimentally measured wave velocity change with temperature against theoretical wave velocity extracted from dispersion curves. Waves are transmitted through an aluminium plate using a pitch-catch wedge transducer configuration, and wave velocity is measured using across-correlation function. Temperature is controlled with a hot plate from room temperature to 100°C, and monitored using thermocouples. Results show that this transducer configuration is capable of monitoring a change in temperature based on a change in wave velocity, showing a good agreement with theoretical predictions, within 4.89+/-2.27 m/s on average. The temperature sensitivity of the system is 1.26–1.78 m/s/°C over the range 24°C–94°C. This shows the potential for a guided wave based temperature monitoring system, assuming a suitable transducer configuration can be found that is able to operate at higher temperatures. Further investigation will study the possibility of using Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors (PWAS) or waveguides for this application.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 28 July 2021
Venue - Dates: AIAA Propulsion and Energy 2021 Forum, Virtual event, 2021-08-09 - 2021-08-11
Keywords: Lamb waves, Ultrasonic guided waves, Condition monitoring, Nozzle guide vanes

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 451342
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/451342
PURE UUID: 9d830855-0239-4857-9e4b-105f5cb8f19b
ORCID for Lawrence Yule: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0324-6642
ORCID for Martyn Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6448-9448
ORCID for Nicholas Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4122-2219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Sep 2021 16:32
Last modified: 22 Sep 2021 01:58

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Lawrence Yule ORCID iD
Author: Martyn Hill ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Harris ORCID iD
Author: Bahareh Zaghari

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×