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Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in rivers and estuaries

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in rivers and estuaries
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in rivers and estuaries
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are a set of low molecular weight compounds typically with a low boiling point. They have previously been observed as important in atmospheric and oceanic environments, however, the relative importance of terrestrial input into oceanic systems has previously not been determined. This is partially due to the difficulty analysing these hydrophilic compounds from solution and the nanomolar concentrations they are typically found in.

This thesis reviews current knowledge of VOC concentrations and cycling, where the global knowledge gaps in VOC concentrations are and the relative importance of riverine and estuarine input. Data was gathered using a membrane inlet proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (MI-PTR/MS) to determine the relative importance of these compounds in the catchment surrounding the Tamar River, in the South West UK. Development work was undertaken to design and validate the use of a membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS) for analysis of isoprene in natural waters, at environmentally relevant concentrations. This was compared with the pre-existing method on the MI-PTR/MS and both were deployed in fieldwork in the Halladale catchment in Scotland, to gain a closer understanding of the importance of humic runoff for these important compounds.

The method developed and data gathered in this research have provided some of the first simultaneous VOC data in riverine and estuarine systems and increased the understanding of these compounds in representative UK onshore water systems
University of Southampton
Hackett, Paul, Lawrence
0daf1d22-3133-4476-946b-77903cda77ad
Hackett, Paul, Lawrence
0daf1d22-3133-4476-946b-77903cda77ad
Purdie, Duncan
18820b32-185a-467a-8019-01f245191cd8

Hackett, Paul, Lawrence (2021) Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in rivers and estuaries. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 151pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are a set of low molecular weight compounds typically with a low boiling point. They have previously been observed as important in atmospheric and oceanic environments, however, the relative importance of terrestrial input into oceanic systems has previously not been determined. This is partially due to the difficulty analysing these hydrophilic compounds from solution and the nanomolar concentrations they are typically found in.

This thesis reviews current knowledge of VOC concentrations and cycling, where the global knowledge gaps in VOC concentrations are and the relative importance of riverine and estuarine input. Data was gathered using a membrane inlet proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (MI-PTR/MS) to determine the relative importance of these compounds in the catchment surrounding the Tamar River, in the South West UK. Development work was undertaken to design and validate the use of a membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS) for analysis of isoprene in natural waters, at environmentally relevant concentrations. This was compared with the pre-existing method on the MI-PTR/MS and both were deployed in fieldwork in the Halladale catchment in Scotland, to gain a closer understanding of the importance of humic runoff for these important compounds.

The method developed and data gathered in this research have provided some of the first simultaneous VOC data in riverine and estuarine systems and increased the understanding of these compounds in representative UK onshore water systems

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Hackett, Paul_Final_MPhil_for award - Author's Original
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Hackett Paul_Permission to deposit thesis - form PH
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Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

More information

Published date: 21 September 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 451558
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/451558
PURE UUID: 0e147fc1-77b7-4304-b37c-7cf67314f816
ORCID for Paul, Lawrence Hackett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1512-7402
ORCID for Duncan Purdie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6672-1722

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Oct 2021 16:30
Last modified: 16 Nov 2021 02:33

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Contributors

Author: Paul, Lawrence Hackett ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Duncan Purdie ORCID iD

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