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A new algorithm to reduce T-wave over-sensing based on phase space reconstruction in S-ICD system

A new algorithm to reduce T-wave over-sensing based on phase space reconstruction in S-ICD system
A new algorithm to reduce T-wave over-sensing based on phase space reconstruction in S-ICD system
Background and objective:
The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) reduces mortality in individuals at high risk of sudden arrhythmic death, by rapid defibrillation of life-threatening arrhythmia. Unfortunately, S-ICD recipients are also at risk of inappropriate shock therapies, which themselves are associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. The commonest cause of inappropriate shock therapies is T wave oversensing (TWOS), where T waves are incorrectly counted as R waves leading to an overestimation of heart rate. It is important to develop a method to reduce TWOS and improve the accuracy of R-peak detection in S-ICD system.

Methods
This paper introduces a novel algorithm to reduce TWOS based on phase space reconstruction (PSR); a common method used to analyse the chaotic characteristics of non-linear signals.

Results
The algorithm was evaluated against 34 records from University Hospital Southampton (UHS) and all 48 records from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. In the UHS analysis we demonstrated a sensitivity of 99.88%, a positive predictive value of 99.99% and an accuracy of 99.88% with reductions in TWOS episodes (from 166 to 0). Whilst in the MIT-BIH analysis we demonstrated a sensitivity of 99.87%, a positive predictive value of 99.99% and an accuracy of 99.91% for R wave detection. The average processing time for 1 min ECG signals from all records is 2.9 s.

Conclusions
Our algorithm is sensitive for R-wave detection and can effectively reduce the TWOS with low computational complexity, and it would therefore have the potential to reduce inappropriate shock therapies in S-ICD recipients, which would significantly reduce shock related morbidity and mortality, and undoubtedly improving patient's quality of life.
R-peak detection, S-ICD, T-wave over-sensing, phase space reconstruction
0010-4825
Chen, Hanjie
7a5b6697-7e34-4787-9254-7995f013e94a
Wiles, Benedict
a42ba978-24c3-4533-8eca-498102004477
Roberts, Paul R.
193431e8-f9d5-48d6-8f62-ed9052b2571d
Morgan, John
7bd04ada-ca61-4a2c-b1cf-1750ffa9d89c
Maharatna, Koushik
93bef0a2-e011-4622-8c56-5447da4cd5dd
Chen, Hanjie
7a5b6697-7e34-4787-9254-7995f013e94a
Wiles, Benedict
a42ba978-24c3-4533-8eca-498102004477
Roberts, Paul R.
193431e8-f9d5-48d6-8f62-ed9052b2571d
Morgan, John
7bd04ada-ca61-4a2c-b1cf-1750ffa9d89c
Maharatna, Koushik
93bef0a2-e011-4622-8c56-5447da4cd5dd

Chen, Hanjie, Wiles, Benedict, Roberts, Paul R., Morgan, John and Maharatna, Koushik (2021) A new algorithm to reduce T-wave over-sensing based on phase space reconstruction in S-ICD system. Computers in Biology & Medicine, 137 (104804), [104804]. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiomed.2021.104804).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background and objective:
The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) reduces mortality in individuals at high risk of sudden arrhythmic death, by rapid defibrillation of life-threatening arrhythmia. Unfortunately, S-ICD recipients are also at risk of inappropriate shock therapies, which themselves are associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. The commonest cause of inappropriate shock therapies is T wave oversensing (TWOS), where T waves are incorrectly counted as R waves leading to an overestimation of heart rate. It is important to develop a method to reduce TWOS and improve the accuracy of R-peak detection in S-ICD system.

Methods
This paper introduces a novel algorithm to reduce TWOS based on phase space reconstruction (PSR); a common method used to analyse the chaotic characteristics of non-linear signals.

Results
The algorithm was evaluated against 34 records from University Hospital Southampton (UHS) and all 48 records from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. In the UHS analysis we demonstrated a sensitivity of 99.88%, a positive predictive value of 99.99% and an accuracy of 99.88% with reductions in TWOS episodes (from 166 to 0). Whilst in the MIT-BIH analysis we demonstrated a sensitivity of 99.87%, a positive predictive value of 99.99% and an accuracy of 99.91% for R wave detection. The average processing time for 1 min ECG signals from all records is 2.9 s.

Conclusions
Our algorithm is sensitive for R-wave detection and can effectively reduce the TWOS with low computational complexity, and it would therefore have the potential to reduce inappropriate shock therapies in S-ICD recipients, which would significantly reduce shock related morbidity and mortality, and undoubtedly improving patient's quality of life.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 August 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 August 2021
Published date: October 2021
Keywords: R-peak detection, S-ICD, T-wave over-sensing, phase space reconstruction

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 451666
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/451666
ISSN: 0010-4825
PURE UUID: c9fdb700-33d9-4062-94d9-e69c542dcc87
ORCID for Hanjie Chen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8024-8804

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Oct 2021 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:13

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Contributors

Author: Hanjie Chen ORCID iD
Author: Benedict Wiles
Author: Paul R. Roberts
Author: John Morgan
Author: Koushik Maharatna

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