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Exploring the capability of natural flood management approaches in groundwater-dominated chalk streams

Exploring the capability of natural flood management approaches in groundwater-dominated chalk streams
Exploring the capability of natural flood management approaches in groundwater-dominated chalk streams
This study aims to address the gap in the Natural Flood Management (NFM) evidence base concerning its implementation potential in groundwater-dominated catchments. We generated a typology of 198 chalk catchments using redundancy analysis and hierarchical clustering. Three catchment typologies were identified: (1) large catchments, (2) headwater catchments with permeable soils, and (3) catchments with impermeable soils and surfaces (urban and suburban land uses). The literature suggests that natural flood management application is most effective for catchments <20 km2, reducing the likelihood of significant flood mitigation in large catchments. The relatively lower proportion of surface runoff and higher recharge in permeable catchments diminishes natural flood management’s likely efficacy. Impermeable catchments are most suited to natural flood management due to a wide variety of flow pathways, making the full suite of natural flood management interventions applicable. Detailed groundwater flood maps and hydrological models are required to identify catchments where NFM can be used in a targeted manner to de-synchronise sub-catchment flood waves or to intercept runoff generated via groundwater emergence. Whilst our analysis suggests that most chalk groundwater-dominated catchments in this sample are unlikely to benefit from significant flood reductions due to natural flood management, the positive impact on ecosystem services and biodiversity makes it an attractive proposition
Base flow, Chalk streams, Groundwater flooding, Hierarchical clustering, Natural flood management, Recharge, Redundancy analysis, Surface runoff, Transmissivity
2073-4441
Barnsley, Imogen
0965597d-6008-4b1c-9d5e-b2544a57ecf3
Spake, Rebecca
1cda8ad0-2ab2-45d9-a844-ec3d8be2786a
Sheffield, Justin
dd66575b-a4dc-4190-ad95-df2d6aaaaa6b
Leyland, Julian
6b1bb9b9-f3d5-4f40-8dd3-232139510e15
Sykes, Tim
4fd50c6b-d311-4aa9-ae3a-31b2945f486a
Sear, David
ccd892ab-a93d-4073-a11c-b8bca42ecfd3
Barnsley, Imogen
0965597d-6008-4b1c-9d5e-b2544a57ecf3
Spake, Rebecca
1cda8ad0-2ab2-45d9-a844-ec3d8be2786a
Sheffield, Justin
dd66575b-a4dc-4190-ad95-df2d6aaaaa6b
Leyland, Julian
6b1bb9b9-f3d5-4f40-8dd3-232139510e15
Sykes, Tim
4fd50c6b-d311-4aa9-ae3a-31b2945f486a
Sear, David
ccd892ab-a93d-4073-a11c-b8bca42ecfd3

Barnsley, Imogen, Spake, Rebecca, Sheffield, Justin, Leyland, Julian, Sykes, Tim and Sear, David (2021) Exploring the capability of natural flood management approaches in groundwater-dominated chalk streams. Water, 13 (16), [2212]. (doi:10.3390/w13162212).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study aims to address the gap in the Natural Flood Management (NFM) evidence base concerning its implementation potential in groundwater-dominated catchments. We generated a typology of 198 chalk catchments using redundancy analysis and hierarchical clustering. Three catchment typologies were identified: (1) large catchments, (2) headwater catchments with permeable soils, and (3) catchments with impermeable soils and surfaces (urban and suburban land uses). The literature suggests that natural flood management application is most effective for catchments <20 km2, reducing the likelihood of significant flood mitigation in large catchments. The relatively lower proportion of surface runoff and higher recharge in permeable catchments diminishes natural flood management’s likely efficacy. Impermeable catchments are most suited to natural flood management due to a wide variety of flow pathways, making the full suite of natural flood management interventions applicable. Detailed groundwater flood maps and hydrological models are required to identify catchments where NFM can be used in a targeted manner to de-synchronise sub-catchment flood waves or to intercept runoff generated via groundwater emergence. Whilst our analysis suggests that most chalk groundwater-dominated catchments in this sample are unlikely to benefit from significant flood reductions due to natural flood management, the positive impact on ecosystem services and biodiversity makes it an attractive proposition

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 July 2021
Published date: 13 August 2021
Additional Information: Funding Information: This research was funded by the UK Environment Agency. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Keywords: Base flow, Chalk streams, Groundwater flooding, Hierarchical clustering, Natural flood management, Recharge, Redundancy analysis, Surface runoff, Transmissivity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 451940
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/451940
ISSN: 2073-4441
PURE UUID: abe5b9bf-9bce-4931-bc06-8ad4e263a9ea
ORCID for Justin Sheffield: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2400-0630
ORCID for Julian Leyland: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3419-9949
ORCID for David Sear: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0191-6179

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Date deposited: 04 Nov 2021 17:31
Last modified: 30 Oct 2023 03:06

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Contributors

Author: Imogen Barnsley
Author: Rebecca Spake
Author: Julian Leyland ORCID iD
Author: Tim Sykes
Author: David Sear ORCID iD

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