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Effects of population structure on the evolution of linguistic convention

Effects of population structure on the evolution of linguistic convention
Effects of population structure on the evolution of linguistic convention
We define a model for the evolution of linguistic convention in a population of agents embedded on a network, and consider the effects of topology on the population-level language dynamics. Individuals are subject to evolutionary forces that over time result in the adoption of a shared language throughout the population. The differences in convergence time to a common language and that language's communicative efficiency under different underlying social structures and population sizes are examined. We find that shorter average path lengths contribute to a faster convergence and that the final payoff of languages is unaffected by the underlying topology. Compared to models for the emergence of linguistic convention based on self-organization, we find similarities in the effects of average path lengths, but differences in the role of degree heterogeneity.
Springer
Danovski, Kaloyan
e1d648c0-67a1-435a-b336-1e81bed69887
Brede, Markus
bbd03865-8e0b-4372-b9d7-cd549631f3f7
Danovski, Kaloyan
e1d648c0-67a1-435a-b336-1e81bed69887
Brede, Markus
bbd03865-8e0b-4372-b9d7-cd549631f3f7

Danovski, Kaloyan and Brede, Markus (2021) Effects of population structure on the evolution of linguistic convention. In Proceedings of Complex Networks 2021. Springer. 12 pp . (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

We define a model for the evolution of linguistic convention in a population of agents embedded on a network, and consider the effects of topology on the population-level language dynamics. Individuals are subject to evolutionary forces that over time result in the adoption of a shared language throughout the population. The differences in convergence time to a common language and that language's communicative efficiency under different underlying social structures and population sizes are examined. We find that shorter average path lengths contribute to a faster convergence and that the final payoff of languages is unaffected by the underlying topology. Compared to models for the emergence of linguistic convention based on self-organization, we find similarities in the effects of average path lengths, but differences in the role of degree heterogeneity.

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Accepted/In Press date: 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 452207
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/452207
PURE UUID: e3c4ca71-1d74-47e7-8b79-e3e9379f349e

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Date deposited: 30 Nov 2021 17:31
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 16:11

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Contributors

Author: Kaloyan Danovski
Author: Markus Brede

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