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Shift work amongst older UK workers and job exit.

Shift work amongst older UK workers and job exit.
Shift work amongst older UK workers and job exit.
Background
Night/shift work may be increasing but there are few data about the prevalence amongst older workers. With governments encouraging people to work to older ages, it is important to know how feasible night/shift work is for them and whether there are any adverse health consequences.

Aims
Amongst current older workers (aged 50–64 years), to explore the prevalence of night/shift working and evaluate its health impacts and sustainability over 4 years of follow-up.

Methods
Data from the Health and Employment After Fifty cohort were used to describe the demographic, job and health characteristics of men and women undertaking night/shift work. Longitudinal data were used to examine the number and nature of exits annually thereafter.

Results
Amongst the 5409 working at baseline, 32% reported night/shift work in sectors which differed by sex. Night/shift workers were more likely to be: current smokers; doing physically demanding work; struggling to cope at work; dissatisfied with their hours; depressed; sleeping poorly; rating their health poorly. Women whose job involves night work were more likely to exit the workforce over 4 years.

Conclusions
Almost one in three contemporary UK older workers report night/shift work. We found some evidence of adverse impacts on health, sleep and well-being and higher rates of job exit amongst women. More research is needed but night/shift work may be challenging to sustain for older workers and could have health consequences.
0962-7480
Bevilacqua, Gregorio
e93e3b18-7d1e-4da5-9fcd-e6b4637e1c2e
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Stevens, Martin
6ed230b2-7eaa-478b-80f7-ea75234bb76f
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
Bevilacqua, Gregorio
e93e3b18-7d1e-4da5-9fcd-e6b4637e1c2e
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Stevens, Martin
6ed230b2-7eaa-478b-80f7-ea75234bb76f
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109

Bevilacqua, Gregorio, D'angelo, Stefania, Ntani, Georgia, Stevens, Martin, Linaker, Catherine and Walker-Bone, Karen (2021) Shift work amongst older UK workers and job exit. Occupational Medicine. (doi:10.1093/occmed/kqab131).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Night/shift work may be increasing but there are few data about the prevalence amongst older workers. With governments encouraging people to work to older ages, it is important to know how feasible night/shift work is for them and whether there are any adverse health consequences.

Aims
Amongst current older workers (aged 50–64 years), to explore the prevalence of night/shift working and evaluate its health impacts and sustainability over 4 years of follow-up.

Methods
Data from the Health and Employment After Fifty cohort were used to describe the demographic, job and health characteristics of men and women undertaking night/shift work. Longitudinal data were used to examine the number and nature of exits annually thereafter.

Results
Amongst the 5409 working at baseline, 32% reported night/shift work in sectors which differed by sex. Night/shift workers were more likely to be: current smokers; doing physically demanding work; struggling to cope at work; dissatisfied with their hours; depressed; sleeping poorly; rating their health poorly. Women whose job involves night work were more likely to exit the workforce over 4 years.

Conclusions
Almost one in three contemporary UK older workers report night/shift work. We found some evidence of adverse impacts on health, sleep and well-being and higher rates of job exit amongst women. More research is needed but night/shift work may be challenging to sustain for older workers and could have health consequences.

Text
21-OP-099-Article - clean - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 August 2021
Published date: 25 October 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 452234
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/452234
ISSN: 0962-7480
PURE UUID: 5081be2b-f6e7-4e93-bbf1-c34015f8dcd5
ORCID for Gregorio Bevilacqua: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7819-1482
ORCID for Stefania D'angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for Martin Stevens: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6142-5278
ORCID for Catherine Linaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1091-9283
ORCID for Karen Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459

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Date deposited: 01 Dec 2021 17:31
Last modified: 20 Jan 2024 05:03

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Contributors

Author: Gregorio Bevilacqua ORCID iD
Author: Stefania D'angelo ORCID iD
Author: Georgia Ntani
Author: Martin Stevens ORCID iD

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