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Food choice in transition: adolescent autonomy, agency, and the food environment

Food choice in transition: adolescent autonomy, agency, and the food environment
Food choice in transition: adolescent autonomy, agency, and the food environment
Dietary intake during adolescence sets the foundation for a healthy life, but adolescents are diverse in their dietary patterns and in factors that influence food choice. More evidence to understand the key diet-related issues and the meaning and context of food choices for adolescents is needed to increase the potential for impactful actions. The aim of this second Series paper is to elevate the importance given to adolescent dietary intake and food choice, bringing a developmental perspective to inform policy and programmatic actions to improve diets. We describe patterns of dietary intake, then draw on existing literature to map how food choice can be influenced by unique features of adolescent development. Pooled qualitative data is then combined with evidence from the literature to explore ways in which adolescent development can interact with sociocultural context and the food environment to influence food choice. Irrespective of context, adolescents have a lot to say about why they eat what they eat, and insights into factors that might motivate them to change. Adolescents must be active partners in shaping local and global actions that support healthy eating patterns. Efforts to improve food environments and ultimately adolescent food choice should harness widely shared adolescent values beyond nutrition or health.
0140-6736
185-197
Neufeld, L.M
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Andrade, Eduardo B.
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Suleiman, A.B.
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Barker, Mary
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Beal, Ty
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Blum, Lauren S.
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Demmler, Kathrin M.
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Dogra, Surabhi
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Hardy-Johnson, Polly
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Lahari, Anwesha
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Larson, Nicole
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Roberto, Christina A
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Rodriguez-Ramirez, Sonia
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Sethi, Vani
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Shamah-Levy, Teresa
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Strommer, Sofia
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Tumilowicz, Alison
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Weller, Susie
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Zou, Zhiyong
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Neufeld, L.M
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Andrade, Eduardo B.
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Suleiman, A.B.
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Barker, Mary
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Beal, Ty
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Blum, Lauren S.
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Demmler, Kathrin M.
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Dogra, Surabhi
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Hardy-Johnson, Polly
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Lahari, Anwesha
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Larson, Nicole
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Roberto, Christina A
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Rodriguez-Ramirez, Sonia
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Sethi, Vani
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Shamah-Levy, Teresa
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Strommer, Sofia
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Tumilowicz, Alison
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Weller, Susie
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Zou, Zhiyong
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Neufeld, L.M, Andrade, Eduardo B., Suleiman, A.B., Barker, Mary, Beal, Ty, Blum, Lauren S., Demmler, Kathrin M., Dogra, Surabhi, Hardy-Johnson, Polly, Lahari, Anwesha, Larson, Nicole, Roberto, Christina A, Rodriguez-Ramirez, Sonia, Sethi, Vani, Shamah-Levy, Teresa, Strommer, Sofia, Tumilowicz, Alison, Weller, Susie and Zou, Zhiyong (2022) Food choice in transition: adolescent autonomy, agency, and the food environment. The Lancet, 399 (10320), 185-197. (doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(21)01687-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dietary intake during adolescence sets the foundation for a healthy life, but adolescents are diverse in their dietary patterns and in factors that influence food choice. More evidence to understand the key diet-related issues and the meaning and context of food choices for adolescents is needed to increase the potential for impactful actions. The aim of this second Series paper is to elevate the importance given to adolescent dietary intake and food choice, bringing a developmental perspective to inform policy and programmatic actions to improve diets. We describe patterns of dietary intake, then draw on existing literature to map how food choice can be influenced by unique features of adolescent development. Pooled qualitative data is then combined with evidence from the literature to explore ways in which adolescent development can interact with sociocultural context and the food environment to influence food choice. Irrespective of context, adolescents have a lot to say about why they eat what they eat, and insights into factors that might motivate them to change. Adolescents must be active partners in shaping local and global actions that support healthy eating patterns. Efforts to improve food environments and ultimately adolescent food choice should harness widely shared adolescent values beyond nutrition or health.

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Accepted/In Press date: 1 November 2021
Published date: 8 January 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: MB reports grants from the UK Medical Research Council and grants from the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), during the conduct of the study. All other authors declare no competing interests. Funding Information: This work received funding support from Fondation Botnar and the Wellcome Trust. Neither organisation played any role in writing the manuscript or the decision to submit for publication. We gratefully acknowledge support from Mona Ghadirian, Heather Kelahan, and Jamie Marquis to the systematic review of dietary intake evidence. The data for the India case study were analysed from the Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey (CNNS) 2016?18, conducted under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW), Government of India, and Technical Advisory Committee designated by the MoHFW, in collaboration with UNICEF and the Population Council. The CNNS (a previous survey from which we extracted data for the India case study) was funded through a generous grant from the Aditya and Megha Mittal Foundation. The China National Nutrition Survey was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (82073573). Mexico's National Survey of Health and Nutrition was funded by the Secretary of Health of Mexico through a grant to the National Institutes of Public Health, Mexico. We are grateful to the collaborators of the TALENT consortium for making their data available (details of the consortium in appendix). EACH-B is funded by the UK NIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research (RP-PG-0216-20004). The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. VS and AL note that the statements in this publication are the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the policies or views of UNICEF. Editorial note: the Lancet Group takes a neutral position with respect to territorial claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Funding Information: This work received funding support from Fondation Botnar and the Wellcome Trust. Neither organisation played any role in writing the manuscript or the decision to submit for publication. We gratefully acknowledge support from Mona Ghadirian, Heather Kelahan, and Jamie Marquis to the systematic review of dietary intake evidence. The data for the India case study were analysed from the Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey (CNNS) 2016–18, conducted under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW), Government of India, and Technical Advisory Committee designated by the MoHFW, in collaboration with UNICEF and the Population Council. The CNNS (a previous survey from which we extracted data for the India case study) was funded through a generous grant from the Aditya and Megha Mittal Foundation. The China National Nutrition Survey was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (82073573). Mexico's National Survey of Health and Nutrition was funded by the Secretary of Health of Mexico through a grant to the National Institutes of Public Health, Mexico. We are grateful to the collaborators of the TALENT consortium for making their data available (details of the consortium in appendix). EACH-B is funded by the UK NIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research (RP-PG-0216-20004). The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. VS and AL note that the statements in this publication are the views of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the policies or views of UNICEF. Publisher Copyright: © 2022 Elsevier Ltd

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 452837
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/452837
ISSN: 0140-6736
PURE UUID: 38c50cc7-adb3-4e20-b4b8-caa4ce05b844
ORCID for Mary Barker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2976-0217
ORCID for Polly Hardy-Johnson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9659-1447
ORCID for Susie Weller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6839-876X

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Date deposited: 21 Dec 2021 17:52
Last modified: 30 Oct 2023 03:10

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Contributors

Author: L.M Neufeld
Author: Eduardo B. Andrade
Author: A.B. Suleiman
Author: Mary Barker ORCID iD
Author: Ty Beal
Author: Lauren S. Blum
Author: Kathrin M. Demmler
Author: Surabhi Dogra
Author: Polly Hardy-Johnson ORCID iD
Author: Anwesha Lahari
Author: Nicole Larson
Author: Christina A Roberto
Author: Sonia Rodriguez-Ramirez
Author: Vani Sethi
Author: Teresa Shamah-Levy
Author: Sofia Strommer
Author: Alison Tumilowicz
Author: Susie Weller ORCID iD
Author: Zhiyong Zou

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