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Observed vs. possible provenance

Observed vs. possible provenance
Observed vs. possible provenance
Provenance has been of interest to the Computer Science community for nearly two decades, with proposed uses ranging from data authentication, to security auditing, to ensuring trust in decision making processes. However, despite its enthusiastic uptake in the academic community, its adoption elsewhere is often hindered by the cost of implementation. In this paper we seek to alleviate some of these factors, and propose the idea of possible provenance in which we relax the constraint that provenance must be directly observed. We categorise some existing approaches to gathering provenance and compare the costs and benefits of each, and illustrate one method for generating possible provenance in more detail with a simple example: inferring the possible provenance of a game of Connect Four. We then go on to discuss some of the benefits and ramifications of this approach to gathering provenance, and suggest some key next steps in advancing this research.
Blount, Tom
4d4db315-08d9-4701-9604-1e99c60879fb
Chapman, Adriane
721b7321-8904-4be2-9b01-876c430743f1
Johnson, Michael
33a0d8cb-491b-4b3f-b193-540a331ac705
Ludascher, Bertram
f7a7c16c-450a-4439-9587-a3bbeed739ba
Blount, Tom
4d4db315-08d9-4701-9604-1e99c60879fb
Chapman, Adriane
721b7321-8904-4be2-9b01-876c430743f1
Johnson, Michael
33a0d8cb-491b-4b3f-b193-540a331ac705
Ludascher, Bertram
f7a7c16c-450a-4439-9587-a3bbeed739ba

Blount, Tom, Chapman, Adriane, Johnson, Michael and Ludascher, Bertram (2021) Observed vs. possible provenance. Theory and Practice of Provenance 2021. 10 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Provenance has been of interest to the Computer Science community for nearly two decades, with proposed uses ranging from data authentication, to security auditing, to ensuring trust in decision making processes. However, despite its enthusiastic uptake in the academic community, its adoption elsewhere is often hindered by the cost of implementation. In this paper we seek to alleviate some of these factors, and propose the idea of possible provenance in which we relax the constraint that provenance must be directly observed. We categorise some existing approaches to gathering provenance and compare the costs and benefits of each, and illustrate one method for generating possible provenance in more detail with a simple example: inferring the possible provenance of a game of Connect Four. We then go on to discuss some of the benefits and ramifications of this approach to gathering provenance, and suggest some key next steps in advancing this research.

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More information

Published date: 19 July 2021
Venue - Dates: Theory and Practice of Provenance 2021, 2021-07-19

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 452880
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/452880
PURE UUID: c596184e-ab29-4830-be21-b7ec1c9899f5
ORCID for Tom Blount: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4879-5012
ORCID for Adriane Chapman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3814-2587
ORCID for Michael Johnson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5566-6147

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jan 2022 17:39
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:57

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Contributors

Author: Tom Blount ORCID iD
Author: Adriane Chapman ORCID iD
Author: Michael Johnson ORCID iD
Author: Bertram Ludascher

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